Paul Lawrie: Former Open winner would accept Ryder Cup captaincy

Former Open winner Paul Lawrie has said he would accept the captaincy for the 2014 Ryder Cup at Gleneagles.

Lawrie, Open winner at Carnoustie in 1999, said he has "almost" qualified for this year's tournament in Medinah.

However, looking two years further down the line, Lawrie said he would relish skippering the European side.

"No-one would say no to that job. I can't think of anyone in the world of golf who would say no to the Ryder Cup captaincy," the 43-year-old said.

Northern Irish golfer Darren Clarke has backed Lawrie to lead the Europeans when the Ryder Cup returns to Scotland.

However, Lawrie hinted he would need more Ryder Cup playing experience before becoming captain.

"I've only played in one Ryder Cup and I don't think there's ever been a captain that's only played one," he said.

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If I get in Jose-Maria Olazabel's team and you've played a couple of times and my form continues then I don't see why not

Paul Lawrie

"If I get in Jose-Maria Olazabel's team and you've played a couple of times and my form continues then I don't see why not."

However, Lawrie, whose ranking has rocketed to 29 from a low of 272 only 15 months ago, is not taking qualification for this year's tournament for granted.

"It's a long way to go, there's still nine counting events to go," he added.

"I think almost there is correct, but when you're there is when the teamsheet comes out on the Monday and you're there.

"You can go from second to sixth in a couple of weeks if you have a bad spell and other people make a lot of money.

"So, mentally, I'm not there yet. We're almost there, but there's a wee bit of work to be done."

The Aberdeen golfer said that he has got over the feeling of not getting the credit he deserves for his win at Carnoustie.

"I think it did (hurt) for a long, long time, and I think I tried to change people's view of it, but you're just wasting your time.

"Why would you waste time and energy trying to get people to give you respect? You know, you play your golf, you go home to your family and you do what you do.

"The only person it was hurting was me. It's difficult when you win a tournament of that size and people don't give you credit for winning."

Lawrie also laughed off his being wrongly named in Colin Montgomerie's autobiography as Peter Lawrie, an Irish golfer.

"Obviously it's a mistake. I haven't read it, but I believe it's not the only mistake in there," he said.

"Knowing Colin as I do, he'll be furious that there's mistakes been made, obviously, I'm sure, by the publishers.

"I know as well as anyone that Colin knows my name's Paul, and not Peter, so I can't imagine that it's Monty's fault.

"He's sent me a text to say it'll be changed for the second run of the book, so it's not really an issue; but it's funny."