Sochi 2014: James Woods targets ski movie role

British freestyle skier James Woods hopes to land a movie role in order to further promote his sport.

Woods, 22, finished fifth in the first-ever Olympic slopestyle final last week despite suffering an injury which almost ruled him out of the Games.

Leading skiers and snowboarders are often recruited to make films which demonstrate tricks not seen in events.

"By making movies and putting videos on the internet, it just continues pushing the sport," Woods told BBC Sport.

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He [Woodsy] has one of those styles that's sent from god, it's just incredible and I want the world to see it.

Pat Sharples GB head coach

"I love what I do and competing is great, but I just want to get the sport out there because basically that means more people like me can do it and make a career out of it."

Movies often involve elite freestylers performing stunts  in both urban settings - such as snow covered inner city areas - and remote off piste locations, known as the backcountry.

British slopestyle snowboarders Jenny Jones, Aimee Fuller and Jamie Nicholls have appeared in high-profile films in the past whilst 'Woodsy' did make a cameo in a small production  last year.

Despite missing out on the podium in Sochi he retains a high profile in freestyle skiing.

He won the overall World Cup title last year, has claimed two career X Games medals and in March 2013 became Great Britain's first freestyle skiing World Championship medallist in 20 years after securing silver.

As such he is a leading contender to be chosen for a high-profile film.

"I'd love to see Woodsy in the movies," British freestyle skiing head coach Pat Sharples told BBC Sport.

"He has one of those styles that's sent from god really and it's just incredible and I really want the world to see that style.

"Doing some stuff in the backcountry not just in the park and show this all-around skier that he really is."

Slopestyler suffers trouser trouble

Sharples also backed the skier to overcome his injury problems and return to the top of the sport after his struggles in Sochi.

"He finished fifth in the hardest slopestyle final there's ever been on the planet, which with an injury is pretty amazing," said Sharples.

"Woodsy's going to come back stronger without a doubt he hasn't even had chance to showcase his new tricks yet due to his injury and he wants to charge through until 2018 for sure."

The Sheffield-born skier admits he has experienced a "tough" few days emotionally since competing in slopestyle final, but is keen to test himself at the next Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

"This [Sochi Olympics] didn't go exactly as planned for me," said the skier.

"I intend to carry on doing this for a long while yet and 2018 is certainly in my sights as it [winning a medal] would be really nice."

'Woodsy' will take time out from the sport to full rehabilitate his hip injury before returning for a "few exciting events" later in the year.