England v India: Notts chief rejects 'silly' Trent Bridge pitch claims

Nottinghamshire's chief executive has dismissed claims the club deliberately prepared a lifeless Trent Bridge pitch for England's first Test with India.

The pitch, some pundits have suggested,  is one designed to ensure the match goes the distance to maximise revenues.

"The idea that as a chief executive I would put pressure on to produce any sort of pitch is a bit silly actually," Lisa Pursehouse told BBC Sport.

"At Trent Bridge all we want is good cricket pitches."

On a slow, low surface at Trent Bridge that offered no assistance to England's fast bowlers, India eased to 259-4 on the opening day.

Jonathan Agnew - BBC cricket correspondent

"An apology from the Trent Bridge groundsman reflects the stifling impact the pitch has had. Genuine edges failed to carry to the slips and there was no pace whatsoever. England stuck to their task very well yesterday, as did Murali Vijay, who batted all day to score his first century outside India - although the conditions resembled Nagpur rather more than Nottingham."

Several balls bounced twice before reaching the wicketkeeper, a sight described as "utterly demoralising" by BBC cricket correspondent Jonathan Agnew in his BBC Sport column.

Fast bowler James Anderson said the pitch was "frustrating" to bowl on and described England as "amazing hosts" for preparing a pitch that was so similar to the conditions India batsmen would be accustomed to.

Murali Vijay

Murali Vijay survived this run-out attempt on his way to a century on the lifeless Trent Bridge pitch

Pursehouse admitted head groundsman Steve Birks might have made an error in his pitch preparation - a point conceded by Birks himself on Nottinghamshire's website  - but insisted judgement on the pitch should be reserved until later in the match, and promised an "inquest" would be held if the game petered out to a draw.

"We've got a good track record for result pitches and that's what we are looking to achieve," she added on Test Match Special.

"This is a really important time for Steve. He's an excellent groundsman and, if he has made a mistake, could we wait until at least two days before we decide that?

"Steve is the expert here and he hopes it will dry out and be a little bit different. Let's just see if that's the case."