New Zealand v England: Compton & Trott hit centuries in second Test

 

Second Test, Wellington (day one):

England 267-2 v New Zealand

Match scorecard

Nick Compton and Jonathan Trott hit centuries as England punished New Zealand heavily for bowling first in the second Test in Wellington.

Compton followed up his maiden ton in the draw at Dunedin with a more fluent 100 and Trott made an unbeaten 121.

Their second-wicket stand of 210 was the centrepiece of England's imposing 267-2 on day one at the Basin Reserve.

Slow left-armer Bruce Martin, with 1-58 from 27 overs, was New Zealand's best bowler on another unhelpful surface.

Analysis

"I think England will try to press on tomorrow, bat until tea time - perhaps a little more - and then stick New Zealand in.

"They will want to whittle New Zealand out pretty quickly and then press on, because there is a serious threat of rain for the fourth and fifth days.

"If England are to get something out of this game, they are going to have to move fast."

He and his colleagues could be excused a cross word with captain Brendon McCullum, whose decision to put England in to bat appeared increasingly misguided the longer the day went on.

Given that opposite number Alastair Cook said he would do likewise, it was a good toss to lose.

Compton and Trott were the chief beneficiaries, blunting a home attack whose limitations were exaggerated once more by a pitch which offered them negligible assistance under clear blue skies.

Opener Cook was the only batsman to fail - he perished for 17 when he chipped tamely to mid-on - with Kevin Pietersen batting studiously for his 18 not out to accompany Trott to the close.

Trott, for his part, played with supreme authority, and it was a measure of his dominance that a ninth Test century appeared inevitable long before he reached three figures midway through the evening session.

Typically strong off his pads, he also scored freely - and attractively - through the off side, an area which also proved profitable for Compton.

If Compton's Dunedin century was a study in concentration, he demonstrated a noticeably more aggressive approach in this match, pulling forcibly and driving elegantly.

Leading England Test batsmen

8,900 runs: Graham Gooch (118 matches)

8,463: Alec Stewart (133)

8,231: David Gower (117)

8,114: Geoffrey Boycott (108)

7,728: Michael Atherton (115)

7,624: Colin Cowdrey (114)

7,426: Kevin Pietersen (94)

7,260: Alastair Cook (89)

7,249: Walter Hammond (85)

Although he kept the catching cordon interested with his willingness to attack outside off stump, a booming cover drive nonetheless took him to a 224-ball hundred two overs after Trott had reached three figures, off 50 fewer balls.

Compton hit 15 fours in a five-hour innings which will go a long way towards securing his place at the top of the order for this summer's home series against New Zealand - and the two Ashes series that follow.

He and Trott spent 63 overs compiling England's highest second-wicket partnership in New Zealand, Cook having fallen in the 11th over of the day when he checked a tentative drive at Wagner.

Bradmanesque it was not, although Cook at least surpassed Walter Hammond to move eighth in England's all-time list of Test run-scorers.

That England's total was not more imperious owed a deal to Martin, who showed the control which marked his debut last week, while Tim Southee bowled economically, if without menace.

Martin helped restrict England to 22 runs in 17 overs during one absorbing spell after lunch, but Compton and Trott played patiently until the former, attempting to drive one that was not full enough, edged to Ross Taylor at slip.

Despite not looking entirely comfortable, Pietersen helped negotiate the final hour's play, which included 10 overs with the new ball, alongside an unperturbed Trott.