Mo Farah prioritises medals over world records

Mo Farah says medals are more important to him than world records after winning the 5,000m and 10,000m World Championship titles in Moscow.

The Briton, 30, is also double Olympic champion but is considerably short of Kenenisa Bekele's world records.

"In my heart I know a medal means a lot more to me than any world record," he told BBC Radio 5 live's Sportsweek.

"World records are there to be broken but medals are there forever and you can hold onto them."

The Briton joined Bekele as the only men to win the world and Olympic 'double-double' in the distance events when he won Friday's 5,000m final in Moscow, holding on in a thrilling finish to add the title to the 10,000m gold he won on Saturday.

Mo Farah's major medals

  • 2013 World Championships gold (10,000m & 5,000m)
  • 2012 Olympic gold (10,000m & 5,000m)
  • 2012 European gold (5,000m)
  • 2011 World Championship gold (5,000m) and silver (10,000m)
  • 2011 European Indoor gold (3,000m)
  • 2010 European gold (10,000m & 5,000m)
  • 2009 European Indoor gold (3,000m)
  • 2006 European silver (5,000m)

But his failure to have run a world record in his events have led to debate that he is still some way short of being the greatest distance runner of all-time.

Farah's best times for both distances were set in 2011 - the 10,000m time of 26 minutes, 46.57 seconds in Eugene in June and a 5,000m time of 12:53.11 in Monaco a month later - but he is only the 15th and 31st fastest man for the events.

And nobody has come close to breaking Ethiopian great Bekele's bests of 26:17.53 and 12:37.35, which were set in 2005 and 2004 respectively.

But with no major global championship until the 2015 World Championships in Beijing, Farah is not ruling out trying to challenge Bekele's marks next year.

"When you train for championships and you train for a fast time and record, it is different," he added.

"Next year I want to play around with it and train for it and we will see how it goes."

Farah's next major outing will be the Great North Run, which will be shown live on the BBC on Sunday, 15 September, before he tackles his first full marathon in London next April.