Greg Rutherford wants to become double Olympic champion

London 2012 long jump champion Greg Rutherford plans to compete in two more Olympics and wants to add at least one more gold medal to his haul.

Carl Lewis is the only man with multiple long jump gold medals,  winning four in a row from 1984 to 1996.

Rutherford, 25, told BBC Three Counties Radio: "I want to be a double Olympic champion and I think I've got another two in me at least.

"If one of those goes well, that's a great story. It doesn't happen often."

Progression of British record

  • 8.23m - Lynn Davies, Berne, 30 June 1968
  • 8.27m - Chris Tomlinson, Tallahassee, 13 April 2002
  • 8.29m - Chris Tomlinson, Bad Langensalza, 7 July 2007
  • 8.30m - Greg Rutherford, Berlin, 20 August 2009
  • 8.35m - Chris Tomlinson, Paris, 8 July 2011
  • 8.35m - Greg Rutherford, San Diego, 3 May 2012

The Milton Keynes athlete struck gold earlier this month with a fourth-round leap of 8.31 metres, but it was the shortest winning leap since Randy Williams of the USA won the 1972 competition in Munich with 8.24. And Rutherford has no intention of resting on his laurels.

"The other thing is I want to jump much further than I have. I'm not happy at all with the distances I've jumped.

"To win the Olympics with 8.31 was surprising. As much as it was enough on the day, I want more and I expect more from myself," he said.

Rutherford's moment of glory at the Olympic Stadium was sandwiched between the gold medal triumphs of Jessica Ennis and Mo Farah, in the heptathlon and 10,000m respectively, on what has become known as 'Super Saturday'.

"I was saying to everybody else, 'You know what, I could go out and win this' and my team were saying, 'Yeah, that would be amazing' - and Charles van Commenee, our head coach, said, 'If you don't come back with a medal, I don't expect to see you tomorrow.'

"It was banterish, but in a way I think he was being quite serious because I was in a great position, I was never going to get a better opportunity in my life," he said.

Rutherford, who is reportedly contemplating the possibility of doubling up as a sprinter like Carl Lewis did,  also revealed how a lone voice from the crowd provided the final inspiration for his gold medal jump.

"I was walking back and a guy shouted out, 'It's alright, Greg, this is your time' and that got me going a little bit.

"I looked in to the crowd and sort of acknowledged it and thought, 'You know what, that's right, this is going to be my time now,'" he added.