Mo Farah: 'No way to describe' double Olympic gold

Britain's Mo Farah says he cannot describe the emotion of winning his second Olympic gold medal.

Farah, who added 5,000m gold to his 10,000m title, said: "There's no way to describe it. You imagine being Olympic champion once, then it happens twice."

BBC commentator Brendan Foster called Farah's run "the best I've ever witnessed in athletics in Britain".

Foster added: "This stadium is my favourite in the world. Every Saturday night, Mo Farah wins a gold medal."

Mo Farah delights in double Olympic gold

Farah, 29, saluted the home crowd for their support in his achievement of winning the two longest Olympic track races on successive Saturdays.

"The crowd was inspiring. If it wasn't for them, I don't think I would have dug in as deep," he said. "It just got louder and louder, it reminded me of when you go to a football match and somebody scores a goal - wow."

Farah says he will delay a decision on whether to move up to the marathon.

"I've still got stuff to be achieved," he said. "I want to do more track and maybe move up to marathon, but not yet.

Continue reading the main story

I've been working out in the winter over 120 miles a week, so there were days when I got up and I was tired. But when you have a vision and you have a dream, you dig in more

Mo Farah

"I'll speak to my coach and plan it out from now. I've got a great team, so I won't rush into it."

He also credited the training regime imposed by coach Alberto Salazar in bringing him to his peak in London.

"I've been working out in the winter over 120 miles a week, week in, week out, so there were days when I got up and I was tired," said Farah.

"But when you have a vision and you have a dream, you dig in more. I'm just excited, these two medals mean a lot to me."

Farah is one of five Britons to win two golds at these Games, equalling the hauls of track cyclists Sir Chris Hoy, Jason Kenny and Laura Trott, and dressage rider Charlotte Dujardin.

Farah also believes Britain's achievements at these Games can "inspire a new generation".

He added: "I'm sure there are youngsters out there who have seen us and want to become an athlete.

"There are a lot of youngsters who we can inspire. As long as we work on that, I'm sure that we can bring them through."

Farah took 5,000m gold on Saturday by holding off Ethiopia's Dejen Gebremeskel to win in 13 minutes 41.66 seconds, with Kenya's Thomas Longosiwa claiming bronze.

In the process, Farah added his name to the group of illustrious names who have won the 5,000m and 10,000m at the same Games.

Usain Bolt on why he and Mo Farah traded celebrations

Hannes Kolehmainen of Finland achieved the feat in 1912, followed by Emil Zatopek of Czechoslovakia in 1952, Vladimir Kuts of the USSR in 1956, Finland's Lasse Viren in 1972 and 1976, Miruts Yifter of Ethiopia in 1980 and countryman Kenenisa Bekele at Beijing four years ago.

"I just want to thank everyone who's supported me," said Farah. "All my coaches from previous years and all the people who've been involved in my life. I can't thank everybody enough."

His wife, Tania, is pregnant with twins, and Farah added: "Those two medals are to my two girls that are coming. They're twins so there's one for each. They could arrive any day."