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Local dialect

You are in: South Yorkshire > SY People > Local dialect > Locals' language

Adam Stone, Grenocide

Adam Stone

Locals' language

We asked some Sheffield locals about the words and language they use. Read and listen to the interviews with four different people.

Adam Stone

Age: 17
Occupation: Trainee plumber
Lives in: Sheffield
Lived here for: All his life
Born in the area? Yes
Description of own accent: Sheffield
Languages other than English: No

ADAM: Going to the toilet? [That's] going for 'a Bruce'
INTERVIEWER: Who says that?
ADAM: Erm, dunno! Me? You know the film 'Matilda' with the guy that used to have the chocolate cake? Chocolate cake, hence a poo, therefore 'a Bruce'...

Roger Stone, Grenocide

Roger Stone

Roger Stone

Age: 57
Occupation: Self-employed fast food outlet owner
Lives in: Sheffield
Lived here for: All his life
Born in the area? Yes
Description of own accent: Sheffield "common"
Languages other than English: No

ROGER: When I was a kid on Parson Cross, every other word you swore, in fact you put an 'f' in the middle of a word, you split the word up and have eh, you know, that was really good if you could do that.

But at 'ome I never swore, ever...  and then you get used to doin' that - but then when you went in the steelworks everybody swears so you can just do what you want which is wow, you know. S'then you thought: "oh yer kinda 'free'. And so you use a... then you get steel work language as well you know.

Nas Begum-Kaggwa (l) Miriam Abdulla (r) Burngreave

Nas Begum-Kaggwa (l) Miriam Abdulla (r)

Like in a mornin' you'd walk in and say: "Morning bastard, geddin much?" And that weren't really, that's not even, they don't mean, they're not callin you a bastard they're just, it's kind of, bit of fun and that went on... everybody used to do it.

I asked Pete and they did it in their steelworks which were like 15 years later than me, and ah and it's not really swearing at each other, it's just you know ah... that's how it was...

Nasreen Begum-Kaggwa

Age: 30
Occupation: n/a
Lives in: Sheffield
Lived here for: Less than four years
Born in the area? No, Firvale
Description of own accent: Yorkshire
Languages other than English: Urdu, Punjabi

NAS: I remember I was about to walk through, I think it was the airport or something. I knew where I were going but I were just fiddling with something that I had in my hand and this eh guy came up to me and said: "You dis way", (laughter and gasps of disbelief).

"You dis way", like that... you know he was trying to use limited language 'cos he thought I was standing in the middle... of nowhere. Which I was - I was kinda like standing in the middle.

MONA: He was white English?

NAS: So 'e was, I were just fiddling with something maybe in my purse or something like that so he said: "You dis way," and I said "I know where I'm going" (laughter).

MIRIAM [Nas' friend]: Mate!

NAS: Yeah and then he looked and like he was so embarrassed.

MO: How disgusting is that!

NAS: Yeah and he say: "I'm really, I'm really, really sorry it's just that we get a lot of people that end up wandering in the wrong place because they don't know where they're going."

"Yeah," I says - "I'm just trying to put abc together," whatever it were that I were holding on to so I thought that were a bit cheeky.

Mo Salem

Age: 39
Occupation: Education worker
Lives in: Sheffield
Lived here for: Less than four years
Born in the area? No, Yemen
Description of own accent: Sheffield
Languages other than English: Arabic

INTERVIEWER: You've lived in different places, you've had quite a lot of influences?

MO: Um she has.

MIRIAM: Well, both my parents are not English; my father's from the Middle East, my mother is Mediterranean. I was brought up with English, not to learn Arabic or to learn Italian but... English but with accents. 

Obviously my mum spoke differently from my dad but... it was a kind of, a different type of English I s'pose, not 'broken' English cos you're not supposed to use that word 'broken' English.

One funny incident was um, my Mum came with me to visit somebody and a little girl said to me: "What language is your mum speaking?" I goes: "She's speaking English," but she has such a strong Italian accent she thought she was speaking another language.

So... it takes a while to get used to my mum's accent - it's really, really strong but I don't think it has an effect on my... I think maybe when I was younger when I said certain words in a certain way and kids say: "What are you talking about?" But as you grow up and you become aware of the language. It hasn't affected me.

last updated: 04/06/2008 at 14:13
created: 12/01/2005

You are in: South Yorkshire > SY People > Local dialect > Locals' language



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