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Forty Eight Hours

You are in: Southern Counties > Entertainment > Forty Eight Hours > Try this: Deep Underground

A family of cavers

Yabba dabba doo!

Try this: Deep Underground

Now, it's tempting to use a phrase like 'Journey to the Bottom of the Earth' here. But we'll resist that temptation. You won't reach the earth's core, but you could get a whole lot of other stuff from caving....

Video Report: Forty Eight Hours

As you slog along the M23/M25 on a week day morning, spare a thought for the hidden history beneath you.

Stone from the Merstham Mines, which stretch beneath this area, was used in some of Britain's most significant buildings.

A family of cavers

Are we there yet?


It's a good spot to get an idea about whether or not you would like to get to know more about the sport of caving.


We took a privileged look at caving with local scouts, who took us down Merstham Mines in Surrey. Take a look at our film: Just click the In Video link below this line.


The first mines at Merstham are recorded almost 1000 years ago in the Domesday Book and 'Reigate stone' quarried there was used to build parts of Westminster Abbey, Windsor Castle and Henry VIII's doomed palace of Nonsuch in Surrey.

A caver

Things can get a bit tight....


Children no older than 14 would have worked in the mines which lie some 30 metres below ground level and which stretch for a total of around ten miles. Today access to the mines is strictly limited.

last updated: 22/08/07

You are in: Southern Counties > Entertainment > Forty Eight Hours > Try this: Deep Underground



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