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24 September 2014
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Theatre and Dance


Tselane's Song
Tselane's Song

Review: the egg theatre in Bath

Kirsty Gardener
the egg is a new theatre for children, young people and families in Bath. BBC Somerset reviewer Kirsty Gardener went along to the theatre, prior to its public opening, to have a look round.


Put simply, there is nothing like the egg in Bath.

Flying Gorillas
Flying Gorillas

There may be pretenders, but the egg is a unique facility for children who love all things theatrical.

It's a purpose-built theatre, attached physically to the rear of the Theatre Royal, and is part of the company which now boasts a main house, studio theatre and children's theatre.

The launch was heralded by a sound installation, and the eruption of a host of children in white overalls and hard hats into the dark of a drizzly October evening.

Inside, the first performance on the stage, by Fevered Sleep, was somewhat cheesy in the circumstances, but nonetheless highly entertaining, showing two adults discovering the lost pleasures of childhood in dozens of white shoe boxes.

The theatre

But what of the egg?

It is a child's delight. Designed by children for children, it will host shows by children and for children, in a packed year-round programme. 

The seats are long, soft and couch-like and not for the long-legged, since they are built to child specifications.

The auditorium is cosy, seats more than 100 people and is on two levels. It's modern but not garish, with lots of bright red drapery and red corrugated plastic walls.

the egg
Inside the egg theatre

Most innovative of all, it has a soundproof room where parents can take noisy children, but still watch a performance without disturbing anyone.

Celebrating children's theatre

At the top of the building is a huge, ply-clad rehearsal room which will be used largely by the Theatre Royal's youth theatre.

Tselane's Song
Tselane's Song

This is a space which drama schools would give their eye teeth for, boasting a panoramic view of the neighbouring roof tops - think minimalist loft apartment and you get an idea of what it has to offer.

The egg is something of a triumph and cynics should suspend their disbelief. This is a space which, director Kate Cross points out, should celebrate children's theatre, since they deserve top-quality theatre as much as grown-ups do.

It may be for children but it is not childish. The 12-year-old with me was asked her reaction and came up simply with one word: "Funky!"

To find out more about the egg theatre, click on this link:

last updated: 21/10/05
Have Your Say
Have you been to the egg? What do you think of it?
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Mark Gladman
I was at the Theatre last night to see the A Level Student Productions. They were marvellous; Excellent performances, clever, thoughtful and witty. Even hilarous at times. Well done to all concerned. And the venue is first rate.

Mr Williams
I went to see the 'Endgames' in Novemeber. Whilst amazed by the brand new theatre, the standard of work, especially from Wellsway School was remarkable. Well done to all.

Joe burton
I performed at the Egg theatre for the "endgames" productions for Wellsway School in Keynsham for A level Drama, i was in "Stick Or Twist" i thought that the Egg theatre was incredible! and it was an amazing experience.

Kathy Sumsion
I took my grandchildren today, 12th November to see The Pea, The Bean and the Enormous Turnip. It was a brilliant show, they thoroughly enjoyed it, we will definitely be returning very soon.

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