Ben Nevis (Highland)

Panorama

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  • Translation : Venomous mountain
  • Height : 1344m
  • OS Grid : NN166713

Ben Nevis is the highest mountain in the British Isles. It is located at the western end of the Grampian Mountains, close to the town of Fort William. It consists mainly of igneous rock from the Devonian period (around 400 million years ago), intruded into the surrounding metamorphic schists; the intrusions take the form of a series of concentric ring dikes. The innermost of these, known as the Inner Granite, constitutes the southern bulk of the mountain above Lochan Meall an t-Suidhe, and also the neighbouring ridge of Càrn Mòr Dearg; Meall an t-Suidhe forms part of the Outer Granite, which is redder in colour. The summit dome itself, together with the steep northern cliffs, are composed of andesite and basaltic lavas. The mountain has been extensively shaped by glaciation. The first recorded ascent of Ben Nevis was made on 17 August 1771 by James Robertson, an Edinburgh botanist, who was in the region to collect botanical specimens. It was not until 1847 that Ben Nevis was confirmed by the Ordnance Survey as the highest mountain in Britain, ahead of its rival Ben Macdui. The summit observatory was built in 1883, and remained in operation for 21 years. The first path to the summit was built at the same time as the observatory and was designed to allow ponies to carry up supplies, with a maximum gradient of one in five.[13] The opening of the path and the observatory made the ascent of the Ben increasingly popular. In 2000, the Ben Nevis Estate, comprising all of the south side of the mountain including the summit, was bought by the Scottish conservation charity the John Muir Trust.

Features of the area

Highland Group

Highland is one of Scotland’s 32 unitary council areas. It is the largest local government area in both Scotland and the United Kingdom as a whole.

The area was created as a two-tier region in 1975 with Highland Region being divided into eight districts, Badenoch and Strathspey, Caithness, Inverness, Lochaber, Nairn, Ross and Cromarty, Skye and Lochalsh and Sutherland.

In 1996, Highland Regional Council and the district councils were wound up and their functions were transferred to a new Highland Council. It borders Moray, Aberdeenshire, Perth and Kinross, and Argyll and Bute.

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