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16 October 2014

THE MIDGE


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THE WHITE LADY OF ROTHESAY CASTLE

Still she is tormented
Her presence still is here
Still she weeps with broken heart
On Rothesay Castles stairs

It was but many years ago
She sat upon her stairs
Her voice so sweet her skin so soft
Daisies filled her hair

Father o father she did shout
From her window high
To the court yard below
And the towers so high.

I hear you my girl
I hear you my dear
I hear your voice so sweet
Her father would reply

I cannot come to see you now
The Norsemen have arrived
I must stay and fight them all
Or sure we all will die

Oh father Oh father watch your back
Her soft voice did reply
But a sword of steel from a Norsemans strike
Put an end to his reply.

You shall marry a Norseman
This day the Viking said
O no not I said Isobel
And plunged a dagger in her chest

She colapsed up on her stairs in pain
But still her heat raced strong
For I am Lady Isobel
This castle is where I belong

Now I am here year after year
Watching all of you.
The swans with sygnets
The visitors and the dungeons too

Be not afraid to come and see
Where I have lived long years
But watch yourself underfoot
When climbing the bloody stairs

Lady Isobel










Posted on THE MIDGE at 18:50

Comments

how sad and yet strangely beautiful, I'm not good on history is it based on a true story? thanks,

island threads from lewis


beautiful--i've heard about the ghost at the castle--is it lady isobel?

carol from over here


Lovely - I am wondering what was the last name of Lady Isobel - was it Stewart? What year did she die?

Barbara Boyd Livreri from United States




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