BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.

7 November 2014

Arnish Lighthouse


BBC Homepage
Scotland
»Island Blogging
Western Isles

Baleshare
Barra
Benbecula
Bernera
Berneray
Canna
Eigg
Eriskay
Grimsay
Harris
Lewis
Muck
North Uist
Raasay
Rum
Scalpay
Skye
Soay
South Uist
Vatersay

Argyll & Clyde Islands
Northern Isles

Contribute
House Rules

From the BBC
I.B.H.Q.
 

Contact Us

A story of internment

1 March 1916 - Groningen, Holland
The 1,500 men of the Royal Naval Division have been interned in this northern city since late 1914. Among them are just over 100 men from the Isle of Lewis. Donald Macleod is one of them. He was born in the village of Gearrannan near Carloway in December 1891. Donald was in the 1st Royal Naval Division, Benbow Battallion. His former schoolmaster at the Nicolson Institute, Mr Gibson, wrote him a Christmas card at the camp in December 1915. Donald replied on 2nd January 1916, extending best wishes to teachers and pupils at his school. He also expressed the wish that Holland would go to war, which would release his companions in Benbow Battallion and himself back into service for Great Britain.

On 1 March 1916, Donald was lying ill in the University Hospital. He died of pleurisy that day. A collection is held among the burghers of Groningen to buy a huge Celtic cross, out of sympathy with this lad of only 24, who died so far away from home. His mates from D company, Benbow Battallion have organised a huge wreath, in the shape of an anchor.

On passing along Groningen's main street, people stop and bare their heads. Shopworkers stand outside their premises, residents outside their doors, including maids and servants. The cortege finally pulls up at the Southern Cemetery, where Donald is laid to rest.

Donald's wish was not to be granted. Benbow,Drake, Collingwood and Hawke Battallions were to remain interned until the Armistice, in November 1918. Those that returned to the island after the war would not readily speak of their experiences. They felt it a matter of shame that they had led the 'cushy life' of an internment camp, where their fathers, brothers and sons had fought and died in the trenches or in the North Atlantic.

Two more Lewismen would not return home, but lie buried at Groningen: John MacLeay, of Shader, Barvas and John Smith of Lower Bayble. A fourth, Angus MacLeod of Portnaguran, was discharged home for being unserviceable - suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis. He died at Plymouth.

There are suggestions that four internees from Lewis perished in the Iolaire disaster of 1919, when the ship returning them to the island foundered outside Stornoway Harbour.

Posted on Arnish Lighthouse at 17:05

Comments

I love reading these accounts of history from the Lewis perspective on your blogs. They`re always informative but also poignant and personal. A good few of my own older relatives fought and died in both world wars. I like it, that folks remember the ones who didn`t come home still.

Hermit from Sanday


A photo of the Ness war memorial, can be seen at: http://www.iomairtnis.com/images/NessWarMemorial.jpg There are several similar memorials througout the island and the number of names listed from each small village shows the scale of this community's loss.

Annie B from the usual




This blog is now closed and we are no longer accepting new posts.



About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy