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16 October 2014

Arnish Lighthouse


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Oilrig update

The oilrig Sedco 711, which I reported on a few days ago, has now departed for its position off Co Donegal. Apart from being weatherbound in the Minch, the crew of the two anchor-handling vessels (Far Sky and Far Fosna) were changed at Stornoway. The port here has a facility for vessels to change crews, offering a 25% reduction in harbour dues, provided they depart within 24 hours. The third boat, Ocean Viscount, came into port at dusk last night, manoeuvering very gingerly as far as Glumag Harbour, before leaving at 9pm. Apparently, the two tug boats can handle anchors up to 22 tons.

Isles FM also reported that the Coastguard were offered the facilities of the AIS system (Automatic Information System), which I use daily to see which vessels come and go up and down the Minch. The link was previously featured by blogger Thewhitesettler; here are the updated links for points of interest to BBC Island Bloggers.

Stornoway
The Minch
Orkney

Posted on Arnish Lighthouse at 13:48

Comments

HM MCA have actually utilised AIS for about two years at Coastguard stations around the country including Stornoway with the advantage of a big plasma screen and chart layout resulting in a better presentation of data than available via AIS web sites

Jack from all at sea


Sedco 711 eh? In the early to mid 80s I worked as both mud-logger and as MWD surveyor on the Sedneth 701 and the Sedco 700 "the flagship of the fleet" as she was known. Both rigs were under contract to Phillips in the N Sea and also off the west coast of Ireland. Great rigs, great crack, great days!

Mountainman from Mull


I suppose it's pretty obvious if there are no trains people are going to oil rig and tug boat spot. Is it the same garb of tartan flask and anorack or is there a different dress code? I am thinking of taking Agnes Anne on an oil rig spotting holiday - do the women among you think that this is the sort of jaunt that might turn a woman's head?

Donald from With pre fank nerves


More likely to turn her stummick.

Flying Cat from yohoHEAVEho!


Nothing wrong with being an oil rig spotter,it has its benefits for an opertunist,you just got to know the drill,.You go on the oil and send the wife out to goat island on the train to confirm whether or not the rig has six legs,if its only got three,send her back out to see if there is another one behind it.She,ll be gone for days ,knowing how good trains are for running on time,.

Thevitalspark from Point




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