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16 October 2014

Arnish Lighthouse


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Right of passage

This is the transcript of the ACTUAL radio conversation between the British and the Irish, off the coast of Kerry, Oct 98. Radio conversation released by the Chief of Naval Operations 10-10-01:

IRISH: Please divert your course 15 degrees to the South, to avoid a collision.

BRITISH: Recommend you divert your course 15 degrees to the North, to avoid a collision.

IRISH: Negative. You will have to divert your course 15 degrees to the South to avoid a collision.

BRITISH: This is the Captain of a British navy ship. I say again, divert YOUR course.

IRISH: Negative. I say again. You will have to divert YOUR course.

BRITISH: THIS IS THE AIRCRAFT CARRIER HMS BRITANNIA THE SECOND LARGEST SHIP IN THE BRITISH ATLANTIC FLEET. WE ARE ACCOMPANIED BY THREE DESTROYERS, THREE CRUISERS, AND NUMEROUS SUPPORT VESSELS. I DEMAND THAT YOU CHANGE YOUR COURSE 15 DEGREES NORTH, I SAY AGAIN, THAT IS 15 DEGREES NORTH, OR COUNTER-MEASURES WILL BE UNDERTAKEN TO ENSURE THE SAFETY OF THIS SHIP.

IRISH: We are a lighthouse. Your call.

Posted on Arnish Lighthouse at 15:29

Comments

that is the best one yet Arnish, Laughing my socks off as I read.

GrannyE. DBE.RM from Auchenshuggle


Brilliant!

Nic from Coll


I suspect this story is an urban legend which did the rounds on the internet back in 1998 . Then it was attributed to a radio conversation between a US naval ship and the Canadian Lighthouse off the coast of Newfoundland. Funny thought.

pondhead from Mull


That bit of hilarity will keep me laughing all weekend! Thanks so much!

Lori from USA


Excellent but must've got the name of the ship wrong? HMS Britannia is the Royal Yatch which is now in Leith, not an air craft carrier.

Ummm, not saying from Pedantic School of Smarty Pants


Re Ummm trying to claim the pedantic smarty pants award...perhaps we could share it - or you could hack it in half and send me my chunk. ( Were there manned lighthouses in Ireland in 1998?)

pondhead from Mull


Who stocks these pedantic smarty pants? Haven't seen them in JDs or at any of the one day sales in the Caberfeidh.

Annie B from Lone Sheiling


This story was used in a Swedish advert for navigational instruments.

Arnish Lighthouse from Stornoway


What's this about ACTUAL and CNO releases at a risk of being a smarty pants 1. Eight vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Britannia, after Britannia, the goddess and personification of Britain. The first Britannia was a 100-gun first-rate launched in 1682 and dismantled in 1715 for use in building the next Britannia. The second Britannia was a 100-gun first-rate launched in 1719, on harbour service in 1745, and broken up in 1749. The third Britannia was a 100-gun first-rate launched at Portsmouth in 1762, a participant in the Battle of Cape St. Vincent (1797) and Battle of Trafalgar, later renamed Princess Royal, St. George, and Barfleur, then broken up in 1825. Britannia Beach, British Columbia was named after this ship. The fourth Britannia was a 20-gun storeship purchased in 1781 and wrecked the following year. The fifth Britannia was a 120-gun first-rate launched in 1820, a training ship after 1859, and broken up in 1869. The first rate HMS Prince of Wales became the sixth Britannia when she was given the name 1869, as she replaced the previous vessel in the cadet training role. She was broken up in 1916. The seventh Britannia was a battleship launched in 1904 and sunk by UB-50 in 1918. The eighth Britannia was a Royal Yacht launched in 1953, later put on exhibition. 2. The UK had no operational cruisers in 1998 (last being HMS Devonshire - Heavy 1929 - 1954 & HMS Belast - Light 1939 - 1963) only USSN & USSR operated cruisers at that time (apart from Peruvian Navy - Almirante Grau) 3. There were in fact battlecruisers in the British Atlantic Fleet however this fleet was formed in 1909 and ended in 1914, due to upsetting the Germans, was later reformed after the Grand Fleet was disbanded but was again ended in 1932 only seeing action in Jutland. 4. The only operational lighthouse off Kerry at that time was and still is on Skellig Michael’s south western extremity, however it is automatic and unmanned.

Eric Toft from UK


This story's been altered... it was between the British and Americans, not the Irish and Brits!

Dan from UK


The advert I saw was a US warship and an Irish lighthouse.

Robert from Edinburgh


How dare anyone suggest that everything posted on the Internet isn't 100 percent accurate? See, for example, my personal ad where I describe myself as an airline pilot with a perfect body and 160 I.Q.

Jim from Canada


This is fake the real one is a US ship and a canadian lighthouse

Dominic from London


I was on one of H.M.Gallions appoaching Guz(thats Plymouth to you non nautical types) when a young radar plotter reported the Guz breakwater lighthouse steaming at 15knots! We - the unblemished had a good time shining a light into his darkness,(get it!).that makes it a british warship and a british lighthouse,so take yer pick! and thats the point.the tail is both a lesson and a laugh.

OLD SALT from SOUTHSEA BEACH




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