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17 October 2014
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Forum - homelife - Click here to return to the Forum menu page.
 
Hitler's henchman
There is 1 message in this section.

Ewan S Fallon from Seattle USA. Posted 16 Sep 2005.
I was around 14 - flying model aeroplanes with my buddy near Eaglesham, when a high flying 'plane started the sirens going.
Found out the nexy day it was Rudolph Hess defecting....

 
Homelife membories - 1925 - 1934
There is 1 message in this section.

Elizabeth Harper from Lochanbriggs, Dumfries. Posted 4 May 2005.

My first recollection was when I was five years old and we moved from Gatehouse to Sunny Brae, Kirkmahoe in 1925. Our new abode was a room and kitchen with a five yards width space running from the back door the length of the kitchen and bedroom which held coal, sticks, water pail and slop pail. The water was across the road. Here were nine of us there but two youngest born at Sunny Brae later, making eleven children plus my mother and father. The kitchen held a double bed (my parents) with big brass balls adorning the four corners. Pure white bed spread with lace valance and lace curtains at the window. Everything laundered and starched often. A meal ark when opened was divided in two ? one side for flour and the other the oatmeal with shelf running round inside for salt, cream of tartar, baking soad, etc. for bakind. A brass and steel fender, which was polished every Friday and then covered with newspaper, which stayed on until Sunday when it was removed. Our fireplace was a big open range, which burned about half a hundredweight of coal at a time, a big black sway across the fire to hold pots and pans. A huge iron kettle sat simmering on the hob.

 
Playing Balls!
There are 4 messages in this section.

Tricia Tennent from Winnipeg, Canada. Posted 13 Apr 2005.
Mary, You have transported me back in time talking about playing balls! I feel the ugre to dash out right now and play...I was really good at Gibralter! Getting up early to get the best wall was a must and in fact at school, there was always a mad dash to the shelter and you had to stand, arms out, nose to the wall and holding your spot by shouting "nae half halfers for this whole wa'"!
I also have many memories of the belt and the cruel teachers who made pupils hold their hands over a desk so that the back of their hands got a wallop from the force of the belt hitting them. I didn't get it too many times and always took the belt when offered the choice of belt or lines but it wasn't right. I have cringing memories of some poor souls, especially the boys, who would cry as it was so painful and then were humiliated by the teacher for being a weakling. Humiliation seemed an integral part of education then but thankfully, no more.

 
Bigotry
There is 1 message in this section.

Ed Thomson from Angus. Posted 14 Mar 2005.
As a schoolboy in 1944 I lived in Caledonian Place at the old Dalry Road Station I was a pupil at Trinity Academy (Newhaven Station) and travelled daily by train to and from School.
Holy Cross (RC) School was in the same area and their Pupils were always on the same trains.
As teenagers do, I got friendly with a Holy Cross girl who lived in the same street. I asked her out on a "Date" and my parents were horrified that I would go out with a "RC". They would have been even more horrified if they had found out that I had gone with her to St Mary's Cathedral to see what it was all about when I should have been attending Confirmation Class in the Parish Church. We never did have that date but did meet occasionally at the Palais or the Locarno dancing. Her parents weren' too happy either as they were as the saying goes "staunch"! However we parted on good terms when I went off to work at London Airport in 1950. She had a sad marriage and four children and finished up at Niddrie Mains, a widow.

 
New Shoes
There is 1 message in this section.

Anne from Glasgow. Posted 31 Jan 2005.
I remember being taken to Potter's shoe shop in Dundee for my school shoes and sandals. The children's department had wonderful murals on the walls and Miss Mary Mitchell, who was also my Brown Owl, was in charge.
The most fascinating item in the shop, however, was an "X-ray" machine, which purported to show the bones of the feet inside the shoes. There were viewing ports for the parent, assistant and child customer. I can't imagine health and safety legislation allowing that nowadays!

 
During the war
There are 3 messages in this section.

David Woolard from Edinburgh. Posted 1 Apr 2004.
At night my brothers and i would watch the searchlights catch a german bomber coming up the river forth to bomb Rosyth

 
school dinners
There are 6 messages in this section.

Veronica Hann from Queensland Australia. Posted 19 Feb 2004.
looking back over 40 years ago I always remember the school dinners at Caledonian Rd Primary School oh they were tasty and the menu was great you never knew what you were going to have. always 2 courses and I was looking forward to going in to grade 7 because then you could be a server (take the meals around)
It used to cost 1 shilling a week and was great value for 5 meals. Can anyone else remember these?

 
The Belt
There is 1 message in this section.

George Paterson from Portland, Oregon, USA.. Posted 29 Dec 2003.

Attending Bellshill Academy as a young boy in 1940's, we had a woodwork teacher who did not
believe in using the belt,
however when the class was
noisey or unruly he would line
the class in front of the room
hand the belt to the first boy
and have him belt the whole
class, he in turn would hand it to the next student and so on till everyone belted the
entire class, I'am afraid the
bully of the class enjoyed it
more than anyone.
TTFN Geordie

 
1950s childrens clothing
There are 2 messages in this section.

Sarah Forsyth from Edinburgh. Posted 29 Dec 2003.
We didn't have the huge range of clothes that kids have today. Apart from my school uniform which I also wore to church, I seemed to live in a kilt with an aran sweater in winter and an aertex blouse in summer. I wore ankle socks all the time and longed to be like my big sister who wore nylons! For my 12th birthday, I unwrapped a suspender belt and pack of nylons--they were my best present, and my sister had to show me how to put them on! I felt so grown-up.
My brother wore school uniform--navy shorts, white shirt and tie even on holiday and on Christmas day. Although he eventually had a pair of longs for home use, he had to wear the shorts at school until he was 15. Still, it was better than what a neighbour's son had to wear all the time--a tweed jacket and matching shorts!

 
Air Raid w.w. 2
There are 2 messages in this section.

George Paterson from Portland Oregon USA. Posted 29 Dec 2003.
Whenever the anti-aircraft guns
would down a German aircraft
the local military would throw
up a barbed wire fence around the plane and charge you 3p or
6p to come in the fence to
observe the wreck.

 
shopping for treats
There is 1 message in this section.

Les Little from Paisley. Posted 24 Oct 2003.
I remember going to a wee grocers in Causeyside St with my nanna in the early sixties and her buying a 'pat' of butter. I can still see the grocer cutting a bit off the big soft block of butter and patting it with two wooden paddles into a square(ish) shape then wrapping it up in greaseproof paper. Also does anyone remember Browns sweetshop in Broomlands, near Castle St. It was another favourite place of my nanna's. The smell in the shop of sweets and chocolates being made on the premises.....mmmmm. My own favourite haunts were the toyshop on the High St.aat the corner of the pen (can't quite remember the name) and Yankee Mags off Broomlands (now a post office). All the Marvel comics, Commando books etc. and Bazooka Joe's chewing gum.

 
Anderson
There are 7 messages in this section.

lorraine king from Glasgow. Posted 24 Oct 2003.
I was brought up in Anderson as were my mother and grandmother, Does anybody remember the old ferry boat in which my friend,s and I used to skip over to the other side of the clyde for a wee fight with the gorbalonians that is a fond memory of my younger days when I look back now the ferry master must have dreaded the sight of a few children coming

 
children's clothing
There are 4 messages in this section.

Martha Gracey from Fort Worth Texas USA. Posted 8 Aug 2003.
We were stationed in the US airforce at RAF Kirknewton in the 60's. I was jealous of my friends who had traditional kilts to wear to school on holidays. I did wear a school uniform at Carnwath. At Auchengray we just wore what we had. The most handsome boy in the world wore shorts a vest and jacket with a tie and grey shirt. I still think of Daniel as a handsome guy. When I go for job interviews here I usually wind up with a version of my school uniform. A grey pleated skirt, white blouse, and a black jacket (no tie)

 
shopping
There is 1 message in this section.

maureen cowan from uddingston. Posted 16 May 2003.
When the first supermarket opened in the small town of Bellshill, I paid my first visit in the company of my two sons, one in a high pram, and the other by my side. while I myself thought the American way of life had landed, and picked my way through the store, putting goods in my first ever wire basket, my oldest son was busy putting crisps and sweets inside the cover of the pram. The concept of having to pay, in this instance, did not occur to him, as i was picking up what I wanted, instead of standing in front of a counter, being given the goods and then paying, he thought the treats he picked up were free! luckily we were just outside the shop when he produced his cache of goodies. they were duly returned and "modern" shpping habits were explained.

 
Window shopping
There are 2 messages in this section.

Ronnie Semley from Lancashire. Posted 1 May 2003.
My father, also called Ronnie, who passed away last October, used to speak fondly of courting my mother in the early 50s when they would go dancing in the many dance halls across Glasgow.
After the dancing was over they would usually take a stroll hand-in-hand down Sauchiehall Street where all the department stores (and many smaller stores as well) vied with each other to create the most spectacular illuminated window displays. He said they could spend ages just admiring the handiwork of the staff who had created these displays - and would often return during the day to buy something they'd seen. Perhaps there's a lesson for today's shop owners who pull down the shutters at 5pm and don't think of the potential sales to be made from using their window as a giant advert!

 
Isaac Benzies
There is 1 message in this section.

Barbara Clayton from Aberdeen. Posted 25 Mar 2003.
I am certain that my great grandad is in the beginning of this film of Isacc Benzies in Aberdeen. My mum has always told with pride of him having been in the Gordon Highlanders and how smart and upright he looked as commissionaire at Isacc Benzies.

 
1950s childrens clothing
There are 2 messages in this section.

Sarah Forsyth from Edinburgh. Posted 12 Mar 2003.
We didn't have the huge range of clothes that kids have today. Apart from my school uniform which I also wore to church, I seemed to live in a kilt with an aran sweater in winter and an aertex blouse in summer. I wore ankle socks all the time and longed to be like my big sister who wore nylons! For my 12th birthday, I unwrapped a suspender belt and pack of nylons--they were my best present, and my sister had to show me how to put them on! I felt so grown-up.
My brother wore school uniform--navy shorts, white shirt and tie even on holiday and on Christmas day. Although he eventually had a pair of longs for home use, he had to wear the shorts at school until he was 15. Still, it was better than what a neighbour's son had to wear all the time--a tweed jacket and matching shorts!

 
Air Raid w.w. 2
There is 1 message in this section.

George Paterson from Portland Oregon USA. Posted 12 Mar 2003.
Whenever the anti-aircraft guns
would down a German aircraft
the local military would throw
up a barbed wire fence around the plane and charge you 3p or
6p to come in the fence to
observe the wreck.

 
Air Raid w.w. 2
There is 1 message in this section.

George Paterson from Portland Oregon USA. Posted 20 Feb 2003.
Whenever the anti-aircraft guns would down a German aircraft the local military would throw
up a barbed wire fence around the plane and charge you 3p or 6p to come in the fence to
observe the wreck.

 
1950s childrens clothing
There is 1 message in this section.

Sarah Forsyth from Edinburgh. Posted 20 Feb 2003.
We didn't have the huge range of clothes that kids have today. Apart from my school uniform which I also wore to church, I seemed to live in a kilt with an aran sweater in winter and an aertex blouse in summer. I wore ankle socks all the time and longed to be like my big sister who wore nylons! For my 12th birthday, I unwrapped a suspender belt and pack of nylons--they were my best present, and my sister had to show me how to put them on! I felt so grown-up.
My brother wore school uniform--navy shorts, white shirt and tie even on holiday and on Christmas day. Although he eventually had a pair of longs for home use, he had to wear the shorts at school until he was 15. Still, it was better than what a neighbour's son had to wear all the time--a tweed jacket and matching shorts!

 
Air raid 2nd world war
There is 1 message in this section.

George Paterson from Portland Oregon USA. Posted 15 Feb 2003.
Growing up in Uddingston before emigrating to the USA. After an air raid the Germans
would send over a reconnaissance plane, and much to the dismay of the air-raid wardens we as kids would run out in the street and look up at the sky and yell our pictures are going back to Germany.
TTFN Geordie.

 
Fashion in the sixties
There is 1 message in this section.

Annie Cusack from Aberdeen. Posted 13 Feb 2003.
I’ve seen a few changes in fashion in my time. All the stuff the young ones are wearing now was around in one form or another in the decades before. Flares from the 70s, and sixties mini skirts, are still around today. People said the shorter skirts were just a flash in the pan, but the girls are still wearing them today I remember my da’s face when I wore a mini for the first time. A few rows took place over those skirts in our house when I was heading out to the dancing, let me tell you!
They made you feel fantastic though, and we were all wearing them. In the 1960s, some people thought that the idea of women in short skirts was akin to the collapse of society. As the hemlines were rising, our hair was getting bigger too. Going out on a Saturday night meant treating yourself to a can of hairspray, and getting all glammed up for the dancing but backcombing your hair into a big Dusty-style beehive. The ladies' toilets smelt like one big hairspray canister when you went out, and combined with all the cigarette smoke, so it’s a wonder the hall never went up in flames!

 
My Father lived in Glasgow
There is 1 message in this section.

Dr.S.K.Tiwary. Posted 19 Dec 2002.
My father Late Mr.B.S.Tiwary lived at Cathcart Street, Glasgow and studied at St. Stow's School Of Engineering at Glasgow which was used to come under the Glasgow Corporation.
He studied Mech.Engg. He was there in 1932 and lived there till 1936.

 
Life in Ayr
There are 5 messages in this section.

Douglas Lloyd from Ayr. Posted 22 Jul 2002.
I lived at 2 Cathcart Street Ayr, does anyone remember the two tanks outside the Pavilion until the War?

 
ARP Schools
There are 4 messages in this section.

Donald Murray from Glasgow. Posted 24 May 2002.
The boy shown in this film putting on the gas mask in front of the class is Donald Murray. He was 11 years old when the film was made. I am still living in Glasgow and was thrilled to see the film after all this time. At least now my family know what I have been talking about!

 
Life in a Small Town
There are 3 messages in this section.

Alfie Smith. Posted 14 Apr 2002.
Stonehaven in the 1940’s was the place I spent my childhood. It always seemed to be long hot summers then and Stonehaven filled up with summer visitors only to then empty itself again for the winter months. It was in those winter months that one would hear the old folk say that “Stonehaven was just a one horse town”. I used to wonder what they meant by that, because I knew of at least two horses. One pulled the milk cart that delivered the milk, where everyone would queue with their milk jug in hand and the milkman would fill the jugs with his measuring dipper from the churn. I remember one day when he found a dead mouse in the churn and he just lifted it out and, in full view of everyone, he shook the milk off it back into the churn. There was no waste and very little hygiene in those days. Then there was the horse that drew Kennaway the bakers van. I would ask the driver, Andy Simpson, if I could go with him on his rounds to which he invariably agreed. Then I would sit up top beside him and pretend that I was riding shotgun on a stagecoach to Dodge City, keeping a wary eye open for robbers.This horse was replaced by a three wheeled electrically driven van, which just goes to show that electric vehicles are not a new concept.

 
Life during wartime
There are 13 messages in this section.

Margaret Strachan from Aberdeen. Posted 12 Mar 2002.
The scariest thing that happened to me during the war was when a bomb came through our house. We all had a lucky escape, because it actually landed in the house and spun through the rooms. I remember that the siren went at 10 the night before and it wasn’t until the next morning that we were bombed. The house was freezing, so to keep warm, we’d all climbed into one bed which we moved into the living room. It was the bed that saved our lives. If we’d been in any other room we would have been killed.

 
Wartime Evacuations
There are 11 messages in this section.

Betty McNulty from Glasgow. Posted 11 Mar 2002.
I remember getting a tin box, coloured blue, full of sweets, at school. I must have been about 7 years old. Every child got one, it was because of the Duke of York’s Coronation (I think). 1938 was great! I lived in Govan, only five minutes walk from the Empire Exhibition. It was a shame it had to be demolished because war was declared in 1939.

 
Shops and shopping
There are 5 messages in this section.

Lynne Craig from Ayr. Posted 10 Mar 2002.
Ayr High Street hasn’t really changed much in the years I remember it. The only real big change would be the building of the Kyle Centre and the High Street becoming largely pedestrianised. This was a good idea as the pavements were widened and lovely hanging baskets were hung the length of the street. The main local shop in Ayr has always been Hourston's at the top of the town. It is a traditional department store that seems to be as much a constant in Ayr as Burns’ Statue or the beach. I remember going there with both my grandmothers as a child for assorted nick nacks, with my mother for the painful picking of my school uniform and now to pick gifts for my own upcoming wedding.

 
Cooking, Cleaning and Household Chores
There are 6 messages in this section.

Ian Douglas from Glasgow . Posted 10 Mar 2002.
The house in which I was brought up will be known to many who live in the West of Scotland. It was the big house in the Botanic Gardens that is now a visitor centre, offices and a flat. In my time it was all one big house, which did not have electricity. Let me take you on a tour... We always used the back door, which after a short corridor entered the washhouse/scullery. This room had a concrete floor sloping to a drain in the centre of the floor, in a corner was the wash boiler, this was brick built with an iron liner and heated by coal. The dirty clothes were placed in the boiler, cold water added from a tap above it and the fire set. When the water was hot the clothes were pummelled with a wooden pole to agitate them. When the washing was clean the clothes were lifted using the pole into the large deep wally sink next to the boiler and they were rinsed. Drying was started with a mangle which had two large wooden rollers and a handle on a big gear wheel. After this the washing was put on the line outside to dry or hung on the pulley in the Kitchen.



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