Computer-generated image of dark matter's potential distribution

Dark matter

In the 1970s, an astronomer called Vera Rubin was measuring the velocities of stars in other galaxies and noticed something strange: the stars at the galaxies' edges moved faster than had been predicted. To reconcile her observations with the law of gravity, scientists proposed that there is matter we can't see and called it dark matter.

Physicists are racing to find subatomic particles that could be the missing dark matter, which is thought to make up about 26% of the energy density of the Universe.

Image: A computer-generated image of dark matter's potential distribution across millions of light years of space

Watch and listen to clips from past programmes TV clips [9] Radio Programmes [1]

Computer-generated image of dark matter's potential distribution

Introduction

Invisible matter helps to hold the Universe together.

About Dark matter

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