Percival Lowell

Percival Lowell

Percival Lowell

Nineteenth and early 20th century American astronomer Percival Lowell predicted Pluto's existence (it was discovered in 1930 by Clyde Tombaugh) and founded one of the oldest observatories in the United States.

However, he will probably be best remembered as an ardent supporter of the theory that an advanced alien civilisation irrigated crops on Mars's surface with water drawn from the planet's poles along a canal network.

Historians now believe the canals Lowell mapped were faint surface features or even the product of his imagination.

Photo: Percival Lowell in the observatory he built at Flagstaff, Arizona (Mary Evans Picture Library)

Watch and listen to clips from past programmes TV clips [3]

Percival Lowell

About Percival Lowell

The Pluto searcher sees canals on Mars.

About Percival Lowell

Percival Lawrence Lowell (March 13, 1855 – November 12, 1916) was an American businessman, author, mathematician, and astronomer who fueled speculation that there were canals on Mars. He founded the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, and formed the beginning of the effort that led to the discovery of Pluto 14 years after his death. The choice of the name was made by eleven-year-old Venetia Phair.

Read more at Wikipedia

This entry is from Wikipedia, the user-contributed encyclopedia. If you find the content in the 'About' section factually incorrect, defamatory or highly offensive you can edit this article at Wikipedia.