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20 October 2014
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Writing Task lesson plan

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Writing task lesson plan

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KS3 Bitesize

Objectives

To consider the parallel relationships in Much Ado About Nothing and the structure of the play within an extended piece of writing. All students will express a point of view about the relationships within the play, most students will write a discursive piece using evidence form the play, some students will understand the structure of the play and evaluate the portrayal and dramatic purpose of the characters.

Bitesize English fish

National Curriculum

  • EN1: 2f, 3a, 3b
  • EN2: 1b, 1d
  • EN3: 1i, 1m, 1o, 2a

Resources

  • Much Ado About Nothing: Writing task worksheet
  • Copies of Much Ado About Nothing
  • Song lyrics: Simon and Garfunkel's 'El Condor Pasa'

Teaching activities

Introduction

Consider the lyrics to 'El Condor Pasa', why would the singer rather be one thing than another?

Activity

  1. As a class feedback on introductory activity.
  2. In pairs complete the worksheet.
  3. As a class feedback on worksheet.
  4. Using the title In 'Much Ado About Nothing', I'd rather be ________________ than _______________ (Insert a pair from the worksheet).
    Work through an example as a class following the structure Introduction, a brief and relevant description of 'Much Ado' Which pair?
    Who are they?
    What happens to them?
    Why?
    Where are they by the end of the play?
    Why?
    Conclusion.
  5. Evidence must be presented to support analysis of character and event.
  6. The more able students should be encouraged to choose less obvious pairs for examination.

Homework

Write their version of this task.

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