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20 October 2014
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How to use online activities

Penguins on Ice

Curriculum Relevance | Objectives | Game Overview
How To Use With Interactive Whiteboard | How to use only small number of Computers

Curriculum Relevance
Key Stage 1 NC Level: 1/2/3
KS 1 Levels 1/2
En2 Reading 1i, 1k
En3 Writing1a, 1c, 3a, 3b, 3c, 6, 7a, 7b

Objectives
Constructing Sentences - Punctuation, Word Order, Adverbs and Adjectives.

Game Overview
The game will provide practice in constructing sentences, specifically:
  • Game 1 - Make a Sentence (word order)
    Key Stage 1 NC Level: 1/2
  • Game 2 - Which Mark? (Punctuation)
    Key Stage 1 NC Level: 1/2
  • Game 3 - Make it Interesting (adjectives and adverbs)
    Key Stage 1 NC Level: 2/3
A sentence is read aloud and the player has to finish the sentence by either putting words in the right order, adding the correct punctuation or the appropriate adverb/adjective. This is accomplished by dragging a penguin to the correct 'podium'. If a penguin is placed on the correct podium, it spins. If placed on the wrong podium, it will bounce back onto the ice. There is a HELP facility to offer helpful hints. To repeat the sentence, click on Dave on the top left.

If playing in Netscape, you will need Flash player 4.0.20 or above in order to print out the results. There is an option to upgrade your Flash as you access the game.

How to use on an Interactive Whiteboard

Make A Sentence
  • Brainstorm with class what they already know about writing sentences. Bring up first Screen of 'Make A Sentence' and listen carefully to Dave's instructions.
  • Listen to first sentence and click on the 'help' facility on the top right hand corner. Listen to Dave's helpful hints and recap with class, writing the key points on a board, which they can refer to during the game.
  • Click on Dave to hear him repeat the sentence and ask class to direct you to the first word of a sentence and to explain their choice.
  • Then ask class to select the last word in the sentence, again discuss the reasons for their choice.
  • Suggested Questions: what are the three main things to remember about a sentence? Can you put the words in a different order?
  • Ask class if they can spot any 'description' words, 'doing' words or other forms of punctuation such as apostrophes.
  • Introduce adverbs to each sentence and experiment with moving parts of sentences around.
  • As class become confident, split into teams and allow teams to take turns in arranging a sentence. Ask children if they can think of a way to make it more interesting? Can they think of any adverbs/adjectives, which could be added to the sentence?
  • Ask children to complete print-off version individually.
  • Blank out sentences on 'Make a Sentence' print off and photocopy. Give a blank copy to children and ask them to write their own sentences, writing words into penguins. Write up examples. Ask them to cut out the sentences and then to give them to their partner to rearrange. Encourage children to read sentences aloud and to check they make sense.
Which Mark?
  • Discuss the different punctuation marks featured in the game e.g. question marks, full stop and exclamation mark.
  • Bring up first screen of 'Which Mark?'; listen to Dave's instructions and to the first sentence. Click on the help facility at the top right. Listen to Dave's helpful hints and recap with class, write up the key points as a visual reference, for during the game.
  • Focus on childrens' ability to recognise marks and repeat sentences together to discover the context of a sentence.
  • Suggested Questions: What are the different marks used for? How do you know if it's a question? Are there any sentences that could use two different kinds of mark?
  • After the game, split class into two teams. Ask each team to take turns to think up a sentence. As you write up the sentence, ask the team to say the sentence so that the other team can guess the context and then punctuate the written sentence.
  • Ask each child to draw round their hand and to write a question on each finger using a different question word. Use to create a wall display.
  • Disguise a mystery object. Split children into groups and ask groups to write and display questions, which will help them collect information about the object.
  • Ask children to complete print off version of the 'Which mark?'.
  • To recap on other forms of punctuation, use 'Speech Marks', 'Speech', 'Apostrophes'and 'Commas' activity Sheets.
Make It Interesting
  • Discuss adjectives and adverbs and what they do. Give oral examples. Get children to offer other examples of adjectives that could go in the sentence too. E.g. a fluffy cat jumped off the high wall (could be fat, ginger or scruffy cat OR a huge, brick or massive wall).
  • Bring up first Screen of 'Make it Interesting' listen carefully to Dave's instructions and then click on the help facility. Listen to Dave's helpful hints and then recap with class. Write key points on a board, as visual reference for during the game.
  • Split class into two teams and return to the first screen. Click on Dave to repeat the sentence and complete the first sentence together. Ask each team to take it in turns to finish the a sentence. Give them 1 minute to brainstorm other adverbs and adjectives that would also fit. List them on board. For every correct suggestion allot a point.
  • Ask children if they can suggest different words that have a similar meaning to the correct word.
  • At the end of the game, group the words listed on the board by meaning and put them into silly sentences.
  • To check and reinforce learning, ask children to complete the print-off version of the 'Make it interesting'.
  • To extend adjective and adverb vocabulary, play 'Word Balloons' or ask children to complete the 'Word Balloons Activity Sheet'.
How to use only small number of Computers

Make A Sentence
  • Brainstorm with class what they already know about writing a sentence. Suggested Question: what are the three main things to remember about a sentence?
  • Ask children to work in pairs when playing online game. Bring up first Screen of 'Make A Sentence' and ask children to listen carefully to Dave's instructions. Recap on how to play and demonstrate how to drag penguins. Show what happens when an error is made. Point out the help facility and suggest they read/listen to Dave's helpful hints. Share each other's first example.
  • Allow children to play the game twice. On the second game encourage children to think of adverbs which could be introduced to the sentences and to experiment with moving parts of sentences around.
  • Split those waiting to play online game into groups of four. Give each group two A3 copies of the print off 'Make a Sentence'. Ask groups to cut up the A3 sheets, so that they separate the incomplete sentences and the penguins into cards. They should then collect, shuffle and share out the penguin cards so that each child has 6 penguins. Ask the group to lay the rest of the penguins face down on the table. The children should take turns to pick up and return a card to the table. The object of the game is to try and collect six cards to form a sentence. When a child thinks that they have a six-word sentence they should lay cards down in correct order. The first child to create a sentence successfully wins the game.
Which Mark?
  • As a class discuss the punctuation marks featured in the game e.g. question marks, full stop and exclamation mark.
  • Ask children to work in pairs when playing online game. Bring up first screen of 'Which Mark?' and ask children to listen carefully to Dave's instructions. Recap on how to play, show how to drag penguins. Show what happens when an error is made. Point out the help facility and suggest that they read/listen to Dave's helpful hints. Share each other's first example.
  • Ask children to take turns to read the sentence aloud, so that their partner can recognise the context of the sentence.
  • Ask children waiting to play online game to draw round their hand and write a question on each finger using a different question word. Use to create a wall display.
  • Select a mystery object and disguise it. Split children into groups and ask groups to write and display questions, which will help them collect information about the object.
  • Once children have played online game ask them to complete print-off version of 'Which mark?'.
  • To recap on other forms of punctuation, refer to 'Speech Marks', 'Speech', 'Apostrophes' and 'Commas' activity sheets.
Make It interesting
  • Discuss adjectives and adverbs and what they do. Give an oral example. Get children to offer other examples of adjectives that could go in the sentence too. E.g. a fluffy cat jumped off the high wall (could be fat, ginger or scruffy cat OR a huge, brick or massive wall).
  • Ask children to work in pairs when playing online game. Bring up first screen of 'Make it Interesting' and ask children to listen carefully to Dave's instructions. Recap on how to play show how to drag penguins and what happens when an error is made. Point out the help facility and suggest they read/listen to Dave's helpful hints. Share each other's first example. Recommend that children re-read the sentence to check it makes sense.
  • As they play the game ask children to collect adjectives and adverbs.
  • Ask them to think of other words that would also make sense in the gap?
  • Ask children waiting to play online game to split into pairs and to choose an adverb to act out. Give 5 minutes to prepare mime. Then ask the group to act out their adverbs for each other to guess.
  • Display some boring sentences, which retell a familiar tale, e.g. Goldilocks and the 3 Bears. Ask children to add words to each of the sentences to make them more interesting.
  • Blank out text on printable version of 'Make It Interesting' and make several A3 copies. Divide children into groups of four. Ask groups to cut up sheet so that each child has a strip of 6 penguins. Ask each child to think up 3 adverbs and 3 adjectives and to write them on the individual penguins. Have some books on hand for children to refer to. Ask children to write their words in the penguins and when they have filled each penguin, to cut their penguins into cards. Put cards into hat.
  • After everyone has played the online game, form two teams, which take turns to pick a word from the hat and make sentences to feature that word. Set a time limit and for every correct sentence allot one point.
  • Use pictures from magazines/newspapers and ask children to write accompanying descriptive sentences featuring adverbs and adjectives.
  • To check and reinforce learning, ask children to complete the print-off version of the game.
  • To extend adjective and adverb vocabulary, play 'Word Balloons' or ask children to complete the 'Word Balloons' Activity Sheet.
Links
Radio Programmes 1, 2, 3 and 4
TV Programmes 1, 2, 3 and 4
Print and Do: Speech Marks | Speech | Apostrophes| Commas|

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