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20 October 2014
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How to use Print and Do sheets

Speech Marks | Speech | Apostrophes | Writing Postcards | Writing A Letter
Commas | Time Connectives | Non-Fiction Reading And Writing (2 Pages)
Planning A Story (2 Pages)

English

INTRODUCTION
The Print and Do sheets are a selection of activities which can be printed off as an A4 sheet of paper. In some cases an activity has 2 sheets of paper to print.

These compliment the online games or cover areas of learning which have not been covered in the games.

The information below tells you how each activity sheet ties in with what your child is learning at school. There are also ideas on what you could do with your child at home to help with that particular area of learning.

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Speech Marks

Curriculum Relevance
  • Use of punctuation marks
  • Basic conventions of speech
Activity
To put the speech marks in the sentences.

At home
  • Read or listen to a story. Write down words and phrases that describe feelings and emotions.
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Speech

Curriculum Relevance
  • Use of punctuation marks
  • Basic conventions of speech
Activity
Writing speech so that it is easier to understand.

At home
  • Collect words and phrases that describe feelings and emotions from stories. Make up some sentences using these descriptive words to describe the way the speech is spoken eg "Get out of there!" shrieked the woman.
  • Act out conversations between characters from a story or a television programme.
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Apostrophes

Curriculum Relevance
  • Use of punctuation marks
  • Use apostrophes to spell shortened forms of words
Activity
Pairing the phrases up with the shortened words.

At home
  • Cut out the word boxes and match the pairs together seeing who can collect the most pairs.
  • Think up other phrases that are shortened by apostrophes eg I have, we will.
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Writing Postcards

Curriculum Relevance
  • To write in a range of forms
  • To write about significant incidents from stories
  • Use correctly punctuated simple sentences
Activity
Writing a postcard to Star or Hutch.

At home
  • Get some travel brochures. Choose a place to go to and imagine that you are on holiday. Get the children to write a postcard home. Remind them to use a capital letter at the beginning and a full stop at the end of a sentence. Read the finished postcard through together.
  • Get an old holiday photograph and cut out a blank sheet of paper to stick on the back so that it can be written on. Write to a friend about the picture on the postcard.
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Writing a letter

Curriculum Relevance
  • To write in a range of forms
  • Use correctly punctuated simple sentences
Activity
Writing a letter to accept Star's invitation to her birthday party.

At home
  • Look at letters that come to your home. Talk about your own address - how it is made up and laid out.
  • Write a letter to say "Thank you" for a present.
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Commas

Curriculum Relevance
  • Begin to use commas
  • Use commas in lists
Activity
Put commas in the sentences.

At home
  • Make up lists together eg when you go shopping, what is needed for school.
  • See who can make the longest list of occasions when a list is helpful eg grocery list, shopping list, recipe list.
  • Ask your child to write down everyday events putting the commas in the right place eg I had egg, chips, tomatoes and peas. OR Say a sentence to them and ask them where they would put the commas.
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Time Connectives

Curriculum Relevance
  • How sequences of sentences fit together
  • Language of time
Activity
Put the actions needed to make tea into the right order.

At home
  • Take your child's favourite story and talk about the sequence of main events in the story. Try and write them or draw them onto a time line to show how the story builds up.
  • Write down a list of the sequence of events in an activity eg getting up in the morning, going to school. First put the commas in the list. Then write the list out into complete sentences using words that tell you when something happens.
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Non-fiction Reading and Writing   Page 1   Page 2

Curriculum Relevance
  • To use non-fiction texts using models read
  • To write non-chronological texts based on structure of known texts
Activity
Read and understand the passage about spring flowers before presenting it as a storyboard on the second page.

At home
  • Read different kinds of texts. Look at dictionaries, encyclopaedias, information books, leaflets etc. Talk about what they do and how they work eg alphabetically, laid out in sections etc.
  • If your child watches an information programme/video, ask them to jot down 2 or 3 things that they learnt by watching it.
  • Read a book together. Ask questions about what you have read. Make some questions easy so your child just has to look in the book. Make some a bit harder where they have to think about it and make up their own answer.
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Planning a Story    Page 1  Page 2

Curiculum Relevance
  • Identify and describe characters
  • Assemble and develop ideas
  • Plan and review writing
Activity
Read the story so far and check understanding by answering the questions on the space bug. Then use the space bug on the second page to help plan the rest of the story.

At home
  • Draw/cut out a picture or make a collage of your child's favourite interest eg horses, cars. Write all the information they know about it around the picture. Use a coloured pen for fun! Write any questions they want answered in a different colour. Use people you know to help answer the question.
  • Take your child's favourite story and talk about the main events in the story. Try and write them or draw them onto a time line to show how the story builds up.
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