Look at me

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A stimulating, practical communication lesson that enables students to empathise with people who have hearing problems and to understand how easy it is for people to be prejudiced and discriminatory.

Lesson objectives

By the end of the lesson, ALL students will learn: That people who are deaf or have a hearing impairment can be discriminated against because of a lack of understanding of their needs.

By the end of the lesson, MOST students should learn: That people who are deaf or have a hearing impairment can be discriminated against because most people lack an understanding of the range of communication methods available.

By the end of the lesson, SOME students could learn: To critically analyse the range of communication methods available to communicate with people who are deaf or have a hearing impairment to minimise prejudice and stereotyping.

Activities for the lesson

Equipment required:

Lesson starter: Grapevine

Whole class

Teacher to whisper a phrase to a student and ask them to pass it on to the next person until every student has received the message. The last person should say the phrase out loud. Class to identify how the message changed as it was passed along.

Teacher to focus on the importance of clear communication - relaying and receiving a message correctly. Even when people can hear clearly difficulties can arise in communication.

Teacher input

Whole class

Teacher to introduce lesson objective: to empathise with people who have communication problems and to address prejudice and stereotyping.

Video Clip

Whole class

Students to watch the video at the top of this page.

Class discussion

Whole class

Teacher to facilitate a discussion on the needs of people who cannot hear and how easy it is to discriminate against these people.

Communication methods

Whole class

Teacher to outline the range of strategies to address communication problems;

  • Sign language
  • Lip reading
  • Non-verbal communication

Communicating

Pairs

Working in pairs, and using Handout 1 - Communication methods, students to take it in turns to communicate with each other using a variety of methods - sign language, lip reading and non verbal communication (gestures), and using a range of greetings such as:

  • Hello
  • How are you?
  • Great, thanks
  • Who are you?

Headphones could be used if available to block out sound.

Evaluation

Pairs

Students to record their feelings on their successes and failures at using other communication methods on:

Class discussion

Whole class

Teacher to facilitate discussion with students on how easy it is to discriminate against people with hearing problems and the ways in which they could reduce poor communication in the future.

Diary Entry

Pairs

Students to write a diary entry on Handout 3 of a deaf person and the communication difficulties/barriers they experience during a Saturday trip to a shopping centre or going to watch a rugby match.

Written comments

Individual

Teachers can use Handout 4 - Comment sheet to collect written comments from the students.

Icon key

Icon Key

Key skills and learning skills

  • Communication
  • Application of number
  • ICT
  • Problem solving
  • Working with others
  • Improving own performance
  • Critical thinking
  • Creative thinking
  • Exploring meaning
  • Reflection
  • Research skills
  • Presentation skills

AFL strategies

  • Sharing learning objectives
  • Use of questioning
  • Effective feedback
  • Modelling
  • Pupil self assessment
  • Peer assessment
  • Ongoing assessment
  • Adjusting teaching/reviewing
  • Plenary

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