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Earthquakes and global warming

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Earthquakes produce shock waves that cause damage. There are two types of seismic wave - p-waves and s-waves. Seismometers can detect these waves and provide evidence of the Earth’s structure.

The ozone layer reduces the amount of ultraviolet light from the Sun that reaches the Earth’s surface. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation can lead to sunburn and skin cancer, but sunblocks can reduce this damage.

Increased energy use and deforestation raise the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This leads to global warming.

Earthquakes

The Earth’s crust and upper mantle are broken up into huge tectonic plates. Where these meet, the Earth’s crust becomes unstable and earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur.

Earthquakes cause damage to buildings, and often lead to loss of life. It is difficult to predict exactly when an earthquake might happen and how bad it will be, even in places that are known for having earthquakes.

Seismic waves

Earthquakes produce shock waves. These travel through the Earth and can be detected using a device called a seismometer.

There are two types of seismic wave.

Properties of seismic waves

  p-waves s-waves
Type of wavelongitudinal transverse
Relative speedfaster slower
What can they travel through? solids and liquidssolids only

P-waves are longitudinal waves like sound waves, and s-waves are transverse waves like light waves

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