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Science

Different substances and their properties

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Metallic bonding - higher

Giant structures with free electrons

Metals form giant structures in which electrons [electrons: Sub-atomic particles, with a negative charge and a negligible mass relative to protons and neutrons. ] in the outer shells of the metal atoms [atoms: An atom is the smallest part of an element that still has the properties of that element, comprising electrons surrounding a nucleus of protons and neutrons. ] are free to move. The metallic bond is the force of attraction between these free electrons and metal ions [ions: Electrically charged particles, formed when an atom or molecule gains or loses electrons. ]. Metallic bonds are strong, so metals can maintain a regular structure and usually have high melting and boiling points.

showing free electrons from the outer electron shells mingled with positively charged metal ions

Atomic structure of a metal

Metals are good conductorsconductor: An electrical conductor is a material which allows an electrical current to pass through it easily. It has a low resistance. A thermal conductor allows thermal energy to be transferred through it easily. of electricity and heat, because the free electrons carry a charge or heat energy through the metal. The free electrons allow metal atoms to slide over each other, so metals are malleablemalleable: If a material is malleable it is capable of being hammered or pressed out of shape without being likely to break or return to the original shape. and ductileductile: If a material is ductile it is capable of being drawn into thin sheets or wires without breaking..

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