Bitesize has changed! We're updating subjects as fast as we can. Visit our new site to find Bitesize guides and clips - and tell us what you think!
Print

Geography

Attractions for tourists

Page:

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  1. Next

Tourism is an important contributor to many countries' economies but it can have negative impacts unless it is properly managed, and the conflicting needs of interest groups are balanced. LEDCs [LEDC: A Less Economically Developed Country (LEDC) has low levels of development, based on economic indicators, such as gross domestic product (the country's income). ] in particular can become dependent on tourism, which is dangerous if the tourists suddenly stop coming.

Types of tourist attractions

People looking at paintings

The National Gallery in London

The human and physical resources found in a particular place often influence tourism to a particular destination. Human resources are tourist attractions that have been made by people, such as the Eiffel Tower in France. Physical resources are the attractions that have been made by nature such as beaches or lakes.

Popular tourist activities

Walkers in the Lake District

Walkers in the Lake District

  • According to a recent survey of British people travelling within the UK, the activity that people like to do the most while on holiday is walking. Walking allows people to enjoy the physical resources of the countryside such as hills, rivers and lakes.
  • The second most popular activity was visiting heritage sites. This includes historical buildings and sites of historic significance. These are human resources.
  • The third most popular activity was swimming. People like to swim at the beach or in lakes (physical resources) or swimming pools (human resources).
  • Other popular activities were visiting art exhibitions, watching performing arts and visiting theme parks (all human resources).

Page:

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  1. Next

Back to Tourism index

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.