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Geography

Human activity in glaciated areas

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Lower glacial landscapes

The lowland areas across Britain, where ancient glaciers have created plains and rolling landscapes and deposited fertile material transported from highland areas, provide an opportunity for different activities.

Settlement in the lowlands

Advantages

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle

  • Lowland areas provide much more suitable locations than harsh highland areas for building villages, towns and cities. Edinburgh, for example, is situated on the site of an ancient glacier.

Disadvantages

  • Towns displace vegetation and wildlife and transform landscapes. They also create problems such as pollution and water and power consumption.

Farming in the lowlands

Advantages

Cows in a field in Somerset

Cows in a field in Somerset

  • The more fertile lowlands offer much better opportunities for arable and pastoral farming than the highlands.
  • This creates jobs and helps boost the local economy.

Disadvantages

  • Intensive farming displaces vegetation and wildlife. It also damages the environment through the use of fertilisers, pesticides and weed killers, and may spread disease to animals and humans.

Tourism in the lowlands

Advantages

A tractor sowing seeds in Oxfordshire

A tractor sowing seeds in Oxfordshire

  • Lowland areas attract tourists who do recreational activities such as horse riding, walking, fishing and boating.
  • Fertile areas are also good for creating golf courses.

Disadvantages

  • Badly-managed tourism can cause damage to the environment through soil erosion, pollution and over-fishing.
  • It can also interfere with local livelihoods (eg those of farmers).
  • Golf courses take land out of agricultural use and remove variety from the landscape.

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