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Capturing data

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Capturing the data

Once you know what you are listening out for, you should record the data. You will need to keep it in a form that allows you to refer back to it so you can analyse it for your assessment. Here are two ideas for doing that:

  1. Transcripts of voice recordings: transcripts are recorded conversations you have written down. You don't need hours and hours of talk but you do need to make sure you write speech down as you hear it - don't correct grammar or add missing punctuation. Transcribe around half a page of speech.
  2. Questionnaire: interview people and capture the data in a grid. Remember you are looking for are variations in vocabulary and accent. You will also need to make a note of the person who is speaking - so you can spot patterns not just in the way individuals speak, but also groups of people.

Here is an example of how you could capture the data from a questionnaire:

 

NameDescription (age, background)Word/s for something good/really goodWord/s for something bad/really badWord you use the mostWords for: friends; hobbies; etc
      

Practise capturing data by visiting the Class Collection over on the BBC Comedy site, and choosing a clip to analyse.

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