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Drama

Approaches to the written paper

Staging a scene

The staging question tests your ability as a designer and how you would stage a specific scene. It tests your knowledge of the play, your understanding of technical elements eg set, lighting and sound and your creativity and imagination.

Which stage to use?

Revision Bite One: Decide which stage would best suit the play you are studying.

Types of stage

Arena stage and proscenium theatre.

Arena stage and proscenium theatre.

Thrust and traverse stages.

Thrust and traverse stages.

Revision Bite Two - Once you have chosen your acting area, you need to be able to draw a basic ground plan. Remember to consider:

Where are you going to position the entrances and exits?

Where are you going to position the audience?

Examiner's tips:

  • Learn the correct name and spelling for the different stages. A catwalk stage is not the correct term for a traverse stage.
  • The stage shape has to correspond to the name of the stage.
  • Keep your basic ground simple - all you need to include are:
  1. Name of the stage.
  2. Draw the basic but correct shape!
  3. Label the entrances and exits.
  4. Label where the audience is positioned.

Use this table to help you decide which stage you are going to use

Thrust StageArena StageTraverse Stage Proscenium Arch StageIn-the-round stage
Describe where the audience will sit in relation to the acting space.
As a member of the audience, how does the location make you feel?
How effective is the acting space with regards to conveying the mood of the play?
Which stage do you, as an audience, think is the most effective and why?

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