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20 October 2014
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Identity
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Identity
  • Online lesson plan
  • Offline lesson plan
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    Offline lesson plan
    Objectives

    Students will learn about ethnic and cultural diversity in the United Kingdom, and about the meaning of 'identity'.


    National Curriculum

    Covers the QCA schemes of work: Unit 0.4 Britain - a diverse society?


    Resources Required

    None – although posters, books or objects from a range of cultures could make the lesson more memorable.


    Teaching Activities

    Introduction:
    Recap on any learning about ethnic diversity in the United Kingdom, e.g. using Census definitions of ethnic groups or knowledge of histories of major immigration movements to the country.

    Activities:

    1. Recap on any learning about ethnic diversity in the United Kingdom, e.g. using Census definitions of ethnic groups or knowledge of histories of major immigration movements to the country.


    2. Ask them to share their knowledge and experience of ways that different people celebrate. This could bring a diversity of cultures from the class members themselves, or within the community, country or wider world. If any celebratory event like Diwali or Chinese New Year is currently topical, this part of the lesson could explore that in more depth.


    3. Next, put up the word ‘identity’ or ask students to write it in their books and consider what it means. A good way to do this is as a ‘spidergram’ where the word in the middle of the board or page can be linked outwards to related key words like ‘name’, ‘appearance’, ‘language’ religion’ and so on. Share the ideas in your diagram with your partner or another pair in the class.


    4. Summarise the topic area for this lesson by building up an agreed spidergram for the whole class on the board or OHP transparency. Go round the class asking: Give an example of this aspect of identity (pointing out one) which is important for you personally. The point should be to collect and share a wide range of ideas about what makes up an individual’s identity, as thoughts to record in books or take away from the lesson and use for further lessons about cultural diversity.


    5. Students write a short piece about ‘me’. Try to describe all the aspects of your identity that make you different from anyone else. Then write a similar piece about a member of your family, or a friend.


    6. After doing these activities, students can get involved in active citizenship for diversity by doing their own project, as Downlands Community College did through a link with Ghana (see Citizenship Action).



    Suggested Homework


    Go back to a story or novel you have read recently. Look at the way the writer creates the identity of a main character. Make a list of bullet points to show how this individual identity is built up in our minds as we read.




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