Learning the football reporting ropes

School Reporters in the press box Lucy (left), Charlotte (centre) and Frankie (right) ready for work in the press box

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Three School Reporters from John Taylor High School in Burton were given the chance to be football reporters for the day when the England Women's Under-17 side took on Portugal in the European Championships. This is their experience of the day.

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Our first interview, of the England band, was a real challenge. You feel "on the spot" being told to think of a question.

But the band were really kind, offering us interviewing advice. By the end of the day we felt like professionals!

Interviewing the England band We interviewed the England band with no notice!

The media centre gave us an excellent view of the match - we really felt part of it as we were surrounded by other journalists.

The atmosphere was electric, with the band and cheering schoolchildren helping to create a memorable atmosphere.

Reporting is hard work! Not only do you have to watch the match, but you have to be able to describe it accurately, without missing any of the action!

It seemed really strange to think that the comments we made were shared with the readers of the BBC sport website, seeing the results in print was great.

This exhilarating match saw both sides play some superb and skilful football.

England took an early lead in the 10th minute and the crowd were delighted.

BBC Sport web page Our reports appeared in the BBC Sport website's live Sports Day blog

England dominated the first half with two fantastic goals scored in consecutive minutes by Evie Clarke (34th) and Atlanta Primus (35th), which resulted in the crowd of schoolchildren showing their delight with endless cheering and Mexican waves.

Four goals were scored altogether in the first half, with a great strike by Portugal's Leandra Pereira, taking the half time score to 3-1.

The moments of tension and excitement continued into the second half with Evie Clarke's strong start to the final 45 minutes.

The tension increased when the Portuguese goalkeeper was given a red card. The incident resulted in England being awarded a penalty, successfully taken by Alice Hassell.

Lucy Porter scored the final goal of this fantastic match. Determination was displayed throughout by both teams, making it an awesome game to watch.

Interviewing Karen Carney England's Karen Carney is an ambassador for the tournament and said our questions were very good

Our half-time interview with Karen Carney really helped to build our confidence. She was really friendly and supportive.

We had to make sure our questions were interesting so she could answer in lots of detail. She spoke about her career, favourite skills and memorable moments.

We had to fit this interview into half-time so we had to be quick!

Soon we raced back to the media seats and took our places for the second half.

We had to watch carefully to follow the Portuguese sending-off as there was a lot going on - we needed to be accurate with our details. As the second half continued we got our questions ready for the press conference - you really do have to think on your feet!

Lois Fidler (right) and Chloe Kelly (second right) and School Reporters at the press conference England manager Lois Fidler (right) and striker Chloe Kelly took questions from the press, including us!

The press conference happens straight after the match so we had to be prepared. The England manager and striker Chloe Kelly joined us to answer questions about their victory.

They spoke to other journalists about how focused they had been to get this far.

We asked them about their preparations for the semi-finals and how they will celebrate their victory.

We felt a lot more confident asking questions at the press conference but still felt nervous. Lucy even thought of a question on the spot!

We had a memorable day - what a fantastic opportunity to see what life as a sports journalist is like.

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