School sport: No more 'short term gimmicks'

School Reporters interviewing Graham Stuart MP School Reporters grilled Graham Stuart MP on the findings of the report

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After a three month investigation into sport in schools and the legacy of London 2012, the Education Select Committee have published their report.

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Working with BBC School Report is of central importance in giving young people a voice and letting them be heard in these political debates that affect their lives”

End Quote Graham Stuart MP

School Reporters Uliks, 13, and Shadia, 14, from Westminster Academy were on hand to cover the report launch and grill Graham Stuart MP, the Committee Chairman, on its findings.

He told the reporters that the Select Committee had considered written submissions, heard oral evidence, visited schools and carried out a survey online which 800 students and teachers had answered.

They found that there had been a series of 'short term gimmicks' from recent governments but no long term investment in school sport, and this needed to change.

'Just the beginning of the journey'

"Successive governments have done short term fixes...we think you need to get good sporting practice embedded early in a child's life, but also for the long term"

Uliks agreed that "primary school is just the beginning of the journey" and felt that it was right to give resources to primary schools, but pushed the Chairman on funding for secondary schools.

Close shot of written questions School Reporters put their questions to the Chair

Mr Stuart argued that "provision of sport in secondary schools is wasted if children are turned off sport in primary school".

Shadia added that all schools should be able to encourage unusual sports too otherwise they might miss someone who could have been "a star".

And what about the role of School Reporters in covering this inquiry? Graham Stuart told that students that it had been "great"! He added:

"We're a bunch of old people sitting on an education committee...working with BBC School Report is of central importance in giving young people a voice and letting them be heard in these political debates that affect their lives"

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So often people say 'I know what's best for you' or 'listen to what I say', so to have your voice heard is really good.”

End Quote Shadia, 14 Westminster Academy

The School Reporters agreed that this was incredibly important to them. Shadia said that "so often people say 'I know what's best for you' or 'listen to what I say', so to have your voice heard is really good".

Uliks felt that being heard was "vital" to his education and that he felt "proud" to have played a role in this report.

Next steps

As for the next steps for the Education Select Committee, Mr Stuart told the reporters that he would await a formal response to the report from the government in the next two months, and that he had a whiteboard in his office full of ideas for his next inquiry.

"We are always interested to have contributions from the excellent reporters at BBC News School Report if they think there is something that we should be looking at!" he added.

Shadia and Uliks have put their thinking caps on!

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