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Wildebeest

Connochaetes taurinus

Key facts

  • 1.3 million - number of Wildebeest migrating through Serengeti
  • 300,000 - number that move through Masai Mara
  • 20 - number of years Wildebeest can live to

Latest Reports

Latest Comments

"What is a wildbeest species?"

Amy

Get in touch if you've got any comments or questions on the Wildebeest.

Big Cat Live cover the Wildebeest migration

Simon King and Jonathan Scott have been reporting on the mass movement of Wildebeest through the Masai Mara as they prepare for the filming og Big Cat Live. We’ve got all the reports, starting with that first one here.

Species information

The Wildebeest's migration is essentially circular is wholly dependent on climatic changes - they follow the rain as it creates new lush grazing areas in a part of Eastern Africa called the Serengeti.

The Migration

At the beginning of the year the Wildebeest are based in the south of the Serengeti where they give birth en masse. They slowly work northwards until they get to the Masai Mara in August when the rains appear. Through autumn they migrate back down to their starting point in the south.

Time and Distance

1800 miles over the course of the whole year.

Reason for Migration

Their movements depend on the rains. They need fresh grazing sites and are constantly on the move, seeking out rain-ripened grasses to eat and water to drink.

What happened in 2008?

During October, Big Cat Live's Simon King and Jonathan Scott reported on the mass movement of Wildebeest from their camp in the Masai Mara National Reserve. Earlier in the year, Peter Bassett, a wildlife cameraman, also had the vast herds of Wildebeest in his sights.

There are four Wildebeest reports in total:

The Future of the Great Migration
Jonathan Scott on Wildebeest
Simon King on Wildebeest
Peter Bassett reports from the Serengeti

Links

Big Cat Live
Masai Mara National Reserve

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