BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.


Accessibility help
Text only
BBC Homepage
BBC Radio
BBC Radio 4 - 92 to 94 FM and 198 Long WaveListen to Digital Radio, Digital TV and OnlineListen on Digital Radio, Digital TV and Online

PROGRAMME FINDER:
Programmes
Podcasts
Schedule
Presenters
PROGRAMME GENRES:
News
Drama
Comedy
Science
Religion|Ethics
History
Factual
Messageboards
Radio 4 Tickets
Radio 4 Help

Contact Us

Like this page?
Send it to a friend!

 

Science
THE MATERIAL WORLD
MISSED A PROGRAMME?
Go to the Listen Again page
PROGRAMME INFO
Thursday 16:30-17:00
Quentin Cooper reports on developments across the sciences. Each week scientists describe their work, conveying the excitement they feel for their research projects.
Contact Material World
LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 1 March
PRESENTER
QUENTIN COOPER
Quentin Cooper
PROGRAMME DETAILS
Thursday 1 March 2007
RSS James Clark Ross in Marguerite Bay (British Antarctic Survey)
The RSS James Clark Ross in Marguerite Bay (credit: British Antarctic Survey)

International Polar Year

This year thousands of scientists from around the world will begin the most intensive period of research on the Polar Regions in half a century.

International Polar Year (IPY) is one of the most ambitious international scientific programmes ever attempted, with 50,000 scientists and 60 nations involved.

Quentin talks to Dr Cunnan Ellis Evans from the British Antarctic Survey who is Secretary for the UK committee of International Polar Year, and Professor Julian Dowdeswell, Director of the Scott Polar Research Institute about the project.

Concrete

Saturday 3rd March 2007 marks the 25th Anniversary of opening of the Barbican. The concrete structure caused some criticism in its day, but can concrete now be seen as a classic building material and how has the substance and manufacture changed since it was invented more than 2000 years ago?

The basic recipe for concrete is ‘sticky stuff’ and stones. The sticky stuff - usually Portland cement, often mixed with a Pozzolanic material such as rice husk ash or fly ash from furnaces - will change chemically into a hard material when water is added.

Concrete is having a bit of a renaissance and researchers are looking at making the manufacture more environmentally friendly: producing “green-crete” using recycled materials and using concrete for some more unusual applications.

Quentin talks to Professor Pal Mangat, Director of the Centre for Infrastructure Management at Sheffield Hallam University, and Bob Cather, Associate Director of Arup Materials Consulting about the history and future of concrete.
Listen Live
Audio Help
DON'T MISS
Leading Edge
The Material World
Current Programmes
Previous Programmes
Science, Nature & Environment Programmes
Current Programmes
Archived Programmes

News & Current Affairs | Arts & Drama | Comedy & Quizzes | Science | Religion & Ethics | History | Factual

Back to top


About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy