BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.


Accessibility help
Text only
BBC Homepage
BBC Radio
BBC Radio 4 - 92 to 94 FM and 198 Long WaveListen to Digital Radio, Digital TV and OnlineListen on Digital Radio, Digital TV and Online

PROGRAMME FINDER:
Programmes
Podcasts
Schedule
Presenters
PROGRAMME GENRES:
News
Drama
Comedy
Science
Religion|Ethics
History
Factual
Messageboards
Radio 4 Tickets
Radio 4 Help

Contact Us

Like this page?
Send it to a friend!

 

Science
THE MATERIAL WORLD
MISSED A PROGRAMME?
Go to the Listen Again page
PROGRAMME INFO
Thursday 16:30-17:00
Quentin Cooper reports on developments across the sciences. Each week scientists describe their work, conveying the excitement they feel for their research projects.
Contact Material World
LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 13 July
PRESENTER
QUENTIN COOPER
Quentin Cooper
PROGRAMME DETAILS
Thursday 13 July 2006
piles of car tyres

The Problem of Used Tyres

An E.U. Landfill Directive comes into effect on July 16th which will ban not only whole tyres but also shredded tyres being dumped in landfill sites.  Roughly 80% of tyres are broken down for further use. For instance when burnt in kilns to make cement.  However there are environmental issues; more energy is required to create this process than the amount of energy produced.  Used tyres can also be used for 'material recovery': kids' playgrounds or carpet underlay. With some 30 million used tyres in the UK every year what happens to them at the end of their lives? Jamie McWhir who's worked as a tyre engineer with a Formula 1 team discusses this with Quentin Cooper and John Campbell, Business Development Director of Vellco, a UK company that collects over six million tyres each year for recycling.

Synthetic Biology

The hot topic in science research right now is synthetic biology.  Engineering principles are applied to biological components and scientists are finding a huge potential for new innovations.  The E. coli camera that uses genetically engineered bacteria that metabolise sugar only in the absence of light, allowing the development of a high resolution black and white image.  Professor Edward Marcotte at University of Texas at Austin, an advisor to the students who developed the E. coli camera, discusses synthetic biology with Quentin Cooper and science writer, Philip Ball.

Listen Live
Audio Help
DON'T MISS
Leading Edge
The Material World
Current Programmes
Previous Programmes
Science, Nature & Environment Programmes
Current Programmes
Archived Programmes

News & Current Affairs | Arts & Drama | Comedy & Quizzes | Science | Religion & Ethics | History | Factual

Back to top


About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy