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Science
THE MATERIAL WORLD
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Thursday 16:30-17:00
Quentin Cooper reports on developments across the sciences. Each week scientists describe their work, conveying the excitement they feel for their research projects.
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Listen to 25 August
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QUENTIN COOPER
Quentin Cooper
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Thursday 25 August 2005
Lungs
Diseased lungs

Lungs from stem cells

This week the BBC are running their "DoNation" campaign, raising awareness about ogan donation in the UK. Organ transplants have been performed over the past fifty years. Yet getting enough suitable organs for patients in need of new lungs, kidneys, livers or hearts is an increasing problem.

And it doesn't stop there - there is a high risk of the organ being rejected by the recipient's own immune system. Requiring many drugs which can have severe side effects.

One solution is to grow the required organ from the patient's own stem cells and this week has seen some success in this field.

Dr. Anne Bishop and colleagues from Imperial College London have successfully converted human embryonic stem cells into lung cells - the first step towards building human lungs for transplantation.

The Royal Society

The Royal Society was set up in 1660 to debate the fast-developing world of science.
It is now the UK 's academy of science, promoting excellence by funding research, and influencing policy and education.

Many eminent scientists have been associated with it but the Society has been attacked in a recent Lancet editorial for being 'lazy' and 'self-serving'.

Astronomer and visiting fellow of the RS, John Gribbin has just written a book about the Society - 'The Fellowship: The Story of a Revolution'. He and Professor Mark Pepys argue that the role of the Royal Society is as important, if not more so, today, when science is having such a massive and ever-changing impact on all of our lives.
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