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Science
THE MATERIAL WORLD
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Thursday 16:30-17:00
Quentin Cooper reports on developments across the sciences. Each week scientists describe their work, conveying the excitement they feel for their research projects.
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LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 28 July
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QUENTIN COOPER
Quentin Cooper
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Thursday 28 July 2005
Illustration of man using Dr John Mann Crombie's apparatus for the self - administration of chloroform, 1873. By permission of the British Library.
Apparatus for self-administraion of Chloroform, 1871

Chloroform

Chloroform was discovered by accident in 1831 when eccentric American chemist Dr Samuel Guthrie mixed hen house disinfectant with whisky.

When Scottish doctors tried inhaling the aromatic chemical they noted an unusual effect - they woke up on the floor.

This new anaesthetic revolutionised Victorian surgery until a growing number of deaths revealed its fatal side effects.

This week Quentin Cooper talks to Linda Stratmann, author of Chloroform: The Quest for Oblivion . They're joined by clinical toxicologist Prof John Henry from St Mary's Hospital.

Chloroform: The Quest for Oblivion. 
Sutton Publishing ISBN: 07509 30993

Doggy DNA

Ever known a diabetic Labrador or a narcoleptic Pinscher? Some breeds of dogs have a higher propensity to certain diseases than others.

Quentin Cooper is joined this week by Dr Jeff Sampson from the Kennel Club and Prof David Balding from Imperial College, London.

They are collaborating to get a better understanding of inherited canine disease.

Because dogs are so closely related to humans, could this work benefit us too?
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