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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
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LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 18 December
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GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
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Thursday 18 December 2008
Jean de Dinteville and Georges de Selve (‘The Ambassadors’) by Hans Holbein the Younger 1533 © The National Gallery, London
T Rex bones in the Museum of Natural History, New York

Face Recognition in Chimps
How many people can you recognise by face? It’s one of the things we humans are good at - and it’s a talent we share with chimpanzees. But what’s going on in their brains? More specifically, do we and they both use the same brain processes during face recognition? Some experiments carried out by Dr Lisa Parr and reported this week in the journal Current Biology have now answered the question.

Pedigree genetics
The BBC decision not to televise Crufts follows public discussion of an issue that’s long troubled some vets and breeders: that certain pedigree dogs suffer chronic problems of ill health. Leading Edge looks at the science that underpins dog-breeding with Dr David Sargon of the Cambridge Veterinary School, and Professor Matthew Binns of the Royal Veterinary College in London.

Hobby-Eberley Telescope
Dr Chris Lintott reports on the Hobby-Eberley Telescope in Texas.

Dinosaur Extinction
The commonly held theory on the mass extinction of the dinosaurs is that it was caused by an asteroid hitting earth 65 million years ago. Princeton palaeontologist Gerta Keller has contested the asteroid claim for more than 20 years. She argues instead that the extinction resulted from the eruption of many huge volcanoes. The controversy flared up again at a recent San Francisco meeting of the American Geophysical Union, shedding light not only on the contending theories, but also on the way that scientific ideas compete for attention. Molly Bentley reports.
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