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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
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LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 11 December
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GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
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Thursday 11 December 2008
Jean de Dinteville and Georges de Selve (‘The Ambassadors’) by Hans Holbein the Younger 1533 © The National Gallery, London
Jean de Dinteville and Georges de Selve
(‘The Ambassadors’) 1533
by Hans Holbein the Younger
© The National Gallery, London

Anamorphic Art

The National Gallery is holding a conference on the art and maths of anamorphosis, where the laws of perspective are taken to the extreme.

Geoff meets Jim Hunt, Emeritus Professor of Physics at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada and artist Patrick Hughes in front of the best known anamorphic painting, Holbein’s The Ambassadors.

Genes that make you eat more

Professor Colin Palmer of the University of Dundee has discovered a gene that makes children eat more.

The gene effects how much of a certain type of food they eat and those who have the gene seem to eat more of the highest calorie foods.

Melting Ice may cool the Planet

Professor Rob Raiswell of the University of Leeds has discovered that as ice bergs and glaciers melt in the Southern Oceans they increase the amount of plankton in the sea.

The plankton absorb carbon dioxide which could help counteract climate change.

The future of the orangutan

Conservationists estimate there are abut 50,000 orangutans in the forests of Borneo, and another 7,000 in Sumatra.

In protected areas they’re doing well, but elsewhere deforestation driven by mining and the creation of palm oil plantations is posing a threat to their survival.
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