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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
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LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 26 October
PRESENTER
GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
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Thursday 26 October 2006
Bee larvae tended by a worker bee
Bee larvae tended by a worker bee.
Credit: Jeff Pettis, USDA-ARS Bee Research Lab.

The Honey Bee Genome

The honey bee is the third insect to have its genome sequenced.  Geoff talks to Professor Gene Robinson, one of the lead researchers on the sequencing project.   

Just what can the findings tell us about the genetics behind complex social behaviour, and why is the bee so important scientifically and for agriculture?

Bee Fossil

The finding of the oldest ever bee fossil is reported this week in the journal Science.

Found preserved in Burmese amber the fossil is 100 million years old and just 3 millimetres long.

What does the bee tell us about the development of pollinating plants?

Nanotechnology

Philip Ball, consultant editor for Nature, reports on efforts to develop a hazard warning symbol for products that contain nanomaterials.

What is a nano hazard and is a symbol to warn for them helpful?

Clouds and Cosmic Rays

Satellite observations made over the last three decades suggest that streams of charged particles, known as cosmic rays, could help cloud formation.

A new experiment at CERN, the particle accelerator in Geneva, has been developed to understand exactly how cosmic rays help seed clouds and why they might contribute to global climate change.

X Prize Cup

Martin Redfern reports from Las Cruces desert in New Mexico on the latest X prize.
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