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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
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Listen to 21 September
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GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
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Thursday 21 September 2006
Image of juvenile Australopithecus afarensis . Credit: Zeresenay Alemseged and Copyright Authority for Research and Conservation of Cultrual Heritages (ARCCH).
Juvenile Australopithecus afarensis. Credit: Zeresenay Alemseged and Copyright Authority for Research and Conservation of Cultrual Heritages (ARCCH).

Lucy's baby?

The 3.3-million-year-old fossilised remains of an Australopithecus Afarensis child have been unearthed in Ethiopia.

The fantastically well preserved remains are offering palaeontologists insights into when our ancestors started walking, what kind of noises they made and how their brains grew to make a modern human.

The death of Cyclamen

Of the 21 species of cyclamen in the wild 18 are likely to become extinct by 2050 because of climate change.

Geoff finds out why the UK 's gardeners may be the key to its survival.

Champagne Supernova

This week in the journal, Nature, astrophysicists report a celestial object that shouldn't exist.

An exploded star 7 billion times brighter than our Sun. How does this change our understanding of the acceleration of the universe?

Bees

Bees are helping police with their enquiries.

Links between the ways bees forage for food and search for flowers and where serial criminals commit their offences are helping police track down where criminals live.
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