BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.


Accessibility help
Text only
BBC Homepage
BBC Radio
BBC Radio 4 - 92 to 94 FM and 198 Long WaveListen to Digital Radio, Digital TV and OnlineListen on Digital Radio, Digital TV and Online

PROGRAMME FINDER:
Programmes
Podcasts
Schedule
Presenters
PROGRAMME GENRES:
News
Drama
Comedy
Science
Religion|Ethics
History
Factual
Messageboards
Radio 4 Tickets
Radio 4 Help

Contact Us

Like this page?
Send it to a friend!

 

Science
LEADING EDGE
MISSED A PROGRAMME?
Go to the Listen Again page
PROGRAMME INFO
Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
Contact Leading Edge
LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 16 March
PRESENTER
GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
PROGRAMME DETAILS
Thursday 16 March 2006
Pathological liars have less grey matter

The relation between genes and addiction to smoking and cocaine
Geoff Watts discusses the reasons why scientists have not yet been able to identify particular genes linked with addiction to smoking. Kirk Wilhelmson from the University of North Carolina has a theory that previous studies have been fundamentally flawed by not appreciating the varied ways in which people smoke - from those who take only three puffs of a cigarette to others who try to suck every last essence of nicotine from the butt.

In a paper published this week, Gerome Breen and colleagues from the Medical Research Council have shown there is a genetic variation in some people's DNA that makes them more susceptible to becoming addicted to cocaine.


White Lies
Our reporter Molly Bentley checks in from San Francisco with the news that scientists at the University of Southern California have been studying the brains of pathological liars and found that they have more white matter - and less grey matter - in their brains than those of us who just tell the odd porkie. This helps us understand people with Autism, who are unable to lie.


Mario Livio
Mario Livio is a former head of the Science Division at the Hubble Space Telescope Science Institute. His latest book is The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved. This takes a look at brilliant figures who changed the way we approach maths. These include the tragically short lived Evariste Galois and Niels Henrik Abel, the nineteenth century mathematicians who gave us Group Theory and the method to solving quintic equations. Geoff Watts talks to Mario about the stars of the book. 
Listen Live
Audio Help
DON'T MISS
Leading Edge
LEADING EDGE
Current Programmes
Previous Programmes
Science, Nature & Environment Programmes
Current Programmes
Archived Programmes

News & Current Affairs | Arts & Drama | Comedy & Quizzes | Science | Religion & Ethics | History | Factual

Back to top


About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy