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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
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Listen to 2 March
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GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
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Thursday 2 March 2006
Box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri)
Box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri)

Is Man Naturally Aggressive?

Geoff Watts discusses the idea that man is not an aggressive soul as most popularly thought, but a sensitive, considerate and cooperative beast. Anthropologist Robert Sussman from Washington University, St Louis, Missouri, has a theory that because of our tendency to live in groups, and our need to make people feel happy which in turn makes us feel satisfied, shows that we are an inherently considerate race. Sussman's research is based on evidence from the earliest known humans who lived over 2 million years ago.

Stroke

Geoff Watts reports on the latest research into the cause and treatment of stroke. Released this week is news that a team of researchers in Florida and Calgary have been working together to protect parts of the brain that are affected by stroke. When a person suffers a stroke there are certain events that happen that trigger the cells in the brain to die, resulting in the physical affects of a stroke that we see. The researchers have found that if particular cells in the brain are targeted with an enzyme, they seem to resist the triggers and remain alive and well. 

TMS Therapy for Stroke Patients

Most people who've had a stroke will be put on some form of physiotherapy in order to get the parts of the body affected to work again. Geoff visits researchers at University College London who have discovered that if you excite the brain by zapping it with an electric pulse, it is more receptive to the instructions given it during the physiotherapy session afterwards - Geoff bravely has a go to see if he too can be excited by an electric pulse. 

Box Jellyfish in Australia

The box jellyfish is the world's most venomous creature and render the tempting waters around the entire tropical coast of Australia are a no-go zone for bathers for at least six months of the year. Species of box jellyfish lurk along coasts of tropical Asia and America but it's the most deadly Antipodean variety, Chironex fleckeri that packs the most lethal punch. Marine biologists at James Cook University in Northern Queensland are studying the animals in hope of better advising when and where it's safe to go into the water.
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