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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
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LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 7 July
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GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
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Thursday 7 July 2005
Tempel Alive with light

Deep Impact follow up 

The US Deep Impact spacecraft fired a probe into Comet Tempel 1 on 4th July to reveal the ancient material beneath.

Geoff Watts talks to scientists on the Deep Impact team about the latest data and what it means.

Epigenetics

A recent study by Tim Spector, director of the Twin Studies Unit at St Thomas Hospital, suggests that identical twins have more in common than just the same genes.

In terms of hair colour, eye colour and facial appearance, twins are pretty much the same. But when you take a more detailed look, discrepancies start to show up. And not just in pairs who've been reared apart, but in those who've shared the same experiences and environments.

Spit test

Molly Bentley reports from Los Angeles on a novel way of screening for disease.

University of California has developed a new diagnostic test that relies on saliva rather than blood as a measure of health.

Didgeridoo secrets revealed

A study from The University of New South Wales has unravelled the secrets of skilled didgeridoo playing.

It turns out that what separates an expert from a novice is the opening and closing of the vocal tract, which alters the acoustics of the mouth, producing a huge range of different sound qualities.

The results suggest that didgeridoo playing may be similar to playing a brass instrument, in which changes to the vocal tract can also influence the quality of the sound produced.
 
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