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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
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LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 10 February
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GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
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Thursday 10 February 2005
The Hubble Space Telescope


Bubble bursts for Hubble

As NASA announces plans to bring down the Hubble Space Telescope, what impact will this have on future space exploration?

Richard Ellis from CALTECH describes how recent improvements in earth-based observations may help to fill Hubble's void.

Ellen MacArthur's weatherman

Geoff Watts talks to yachtswoman Ellen MacArthur's weather forecaster, George Caras.

Surprisingly the good old protractor, pencil and ruler were as key to steering Ellen through the wind and waves as their cutting-edge computer models.

Kyoto is coming

Next week the Kyoto Protocol comes into force. It's been heralded as a breakthrough in the fight against global warming.

But will Kyoto really curb greenhouse gas emissions?

The reductions overall are minute compared with the cuts scientists say are needed to save the planet, and the United States, the world's greatest emitter, refuses to take part.

Leading Edge captures the mood in Europe and the States.

Laughing computers

Whether booking tickets or paying a bill, nothing annoys us quite as much as having to deal with computers.  Oblivious to our feelings, they can drive us to distraction.

Scientists working in speech synthesis believe the way to smooth relations lies in making computers more human. 

Perhaps a laughing computer might ease the tension?

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