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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
radioscience@bbc.co.uk
LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 7 October
PRESENTER
GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
PROGRAMME DETAILS
Thursday 7 October 2004
Beautiful shockwaves surrounding the 1987 supernova.
Supernova SN1987a.
Image courtesy of AURA/NASA/STScI

Watching stars explode
 
Astronomers around the world have turned their telescopes in anticipation of an imminent supernova.  
 
A series of x-ray flashes detected last month are thought to be early warning signs of these dramatic stellar explosions.

Sweet smell of success 
 
When you smell the sweet scent of a rose, your nose is wrestling with about 260 different odours.
 
Thanks to this week's winners of the Nobel Prize for Medicine, researchers are now uncovering the genes responsible for this little known human sense.
 
Sex inequality in underwater  worms 

A highly unusual, new species of worm has been found at the bottom of the ocean.  
 
The males, who are considerably smaller than the females, live inside their partners, in groups of 50 or 100. 
 
When north becomes south
 
Every so often, geologically speaking, the polarity of the earth's magnetic field reverses. 
 
Could recent dramatic dips in the earth's magnetism signal the beginning of another switch - an event not seen on this planet for nearly a million years?

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