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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
radioscience@bbc.co.uk
LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 9 September
PRESENTER
GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
PROGRAMME DETAILS
Thursday 9 September 2004
Phytoplankton
Phytoplankton             ©Natural Visions

Climate Change in the Planktonic World

Plankton - the microscopic plants and animals that form the basis of the food chain in our seas and oceans - have been undergoing a radical shake-up.

It looks like global warming is responsible, changing not only their distribution in the waters but also when they bloom. This could cause havoc for the already depleted fish and mammal populations higher up the food chain. 

Million Dollar Maths

There's a million dollars waiting for anyone who solves one of seven great mathematical mysteries of our time.

Two mathematicians believe they have solutions but will they get the prize? 

Hibernating in Space

Putting astronauts in a state of suspended animation is commonplace in science-fiction. Now the European Space Agency wants to make it a reality. 

Hedgehogs do it and some squirrels do it, but could humans really be made to hibernate? 

Speech Science Sings a New Quantum Tune

Scientists have for the first time reproduced human speech sounds.

It's an achievement that could revolutionise the field of speech recognition and make man-machine misunderstandings a thing of the past.  

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