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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
radioscience@bbc.co.uk
LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 17 June
PRESENTER
GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
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Thursday 17 June  2004
An actor performing Hamlet

This week on Leading Edge – figuring out language, the science of theatre, a cold-hearted fish and why your genes could lead you astray.

Getting into your genes

Two recent studies suggest that genetics may play a part in promiscuity. Geoff Watts speaks to Larry Young from Emory University in the US, who’s studying the sexual habits of voles.

He’s shown that a single gene can turn a wild-living gigolo into a faithful homemaker.

Cold-hearted fish

A fish that lives in the icy waters around Antarctica is helping biologists understand the workings of the human heart.

Figuring out language

Sometimes decoding language isn’t as simple as translating every word in turn. ‘Kicking the bucket’ has nothing to do with kicking or buckets, for example.

So how does the brain make sense of figurative language like this?

Science of theatre

Geoff Watts takes his seat for a performance with a difference.

Neuroscientist Mark Lythgoe presents an investigation into why our brain loves a bit of drama.

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