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Science
LEADING EDGE
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Thursday 21:00-21:30
Leading Edge brings you the latest news from the world of science. Geoff Watts celebrates discoveries as soon as they're being talked about - on the internet, in coffee rooms and bars; often before they're published in journals. And he gets to grips with not just the science, but with the controversies and conversation that surround it.
radioscience@bbc.co.uk
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Listen to 20 June
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GEOFF WATTS
Geoff Watts
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Thursday 20 June 2002
Tim Henman

Tennis

It's that time of year again. The strawberries, the champagne and, of course, the tennis. In Leading Edge, Ali Ayres talks to the experts about the key to any professional tennis player's game - their serve. Just a few days before Wimbledon, she talks to members of the International Tennis Federation about a new bigger ball that may soon make an appearance on Centre Court in an attempt to slow the game down, and she gets to grips with the very latest in tennis racket technology.

Hayfever

Its the time of year for hayfever again. Most over the counter and prescription drugs for allergies try to allieviate the symptoms once the allergy reaction cascade has been activated. However, new research by Brian Sutton and his colleagues at Kings College London has revealed the basis of why allergen reactions are so long lived. Their findings point to possible future ways to block activation of an allergy attack before it begins.

Noah's Flood

Religion and archaeology seemed to be as one when geologist Bill Ryan suggested that Noah's flood could really have happened. Rising sea levels in the Mediterranean after the last Ice Age could have burst through a natural dam into the Black Sea, wiping out coastal communities in what would have appeared like a global cataclysm. But new research questions this. Roland Pease reports on how the Flood story may, after all, be just a myth.

Stem Cells

New research looking at adult bone marrow stem cells, has shown that these cells can differentiate in a similar way to embryo stem cells.  Researchers from the University of Minnesota have shown that these cells are able to differentiate in vitro and in vivo in to all three embryonic germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm. Geoff Watts spoke to Maeve Caldwell from the MRC Centre for Brain Repair in Cambridge, who has been following the work.
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