BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.



BBC Homepage
BBC Radio
BBC Radio 4 - 92 to 94 FM and 198 Long WaveListen to Digital Radio, Digital TV and OnlineListen on Digital Radio, Digital TV and Online

PROGRAMME FINDER:
Programmes
Podcasts
Schedule
Presenters
PROGRAMME GENRES:
News
Drama
Comedy
Science
Religion|Ethics
History
Factual
Messageboards
Radio 4 Tickets
Radio 4 Help

Contact Us



ALL IN THE MIND
MISSED A PROGRAMME?
Go to the Listen Again page
All in the Mind
Tuesday 2100-2130
Wednesday 1630-1700
Exploring the limits and potential of the mind
Contact us
If you've got a comment or suggestion about the programme, contact us
Tuesday 16 December 2008
Listen to this programme in full
Claudia Hammond
The programme that examines how we think and why we behave as we do, with psychologist, Claudia Hammond.
MAGNETIC SEIZURE THERAPY

A brand new type of treatment for major depressive disorders which, it's hoped, could in time replace electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), is being trialled.

Magnetic Seizure Therapy, or MST, uses strong magnetic fields instead of electricity to produce seizures.

The first trials of MST suggest that patients recover from the treatment much more quickly than from ECT.

Claudia Hammond visited the Whitchurch Hospital in Cardiff, one of the centres at forefront of global research into MST, where Consultant Psychiatrist Dr George Kirov showed her the Magnetic Seizure Therapy machine.

DEBT AND MENTAL HEALTH

People in debt have two to three times the rate of depression, three times the rate of psychosis and double the rate of alcohol dependence, compared with other members of the general public.

It’s well-established that debt can make a pre-existing mental health problem worse, but new research suggests that the link between debt and mental disorder is so powerful that debt might actually be causing mental illness.

Professor Rachel Jenkins, Director of the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre and Professor of Epidemiology and International Mental Health at the Institute of Psychiatry in London tells Claudia about the findings of this research.

And Chris Fitch, a Research Fellow from the Royal College of Psychiatrists, tells Claudia about moves to encourage one hundred thousand health and social care professionals to remember to take into account the financial circumstances of their patients.

A GOOD CRY?

Having a good cry usually does make most people feel better, but new research from Holland has found that for people with depression, crying doesn’t seem to bring the same benefits.

In the world rankings for tears – American women and men top the charts, while Bulgarian men and Icelandic and Romanian women claim to barely shed a tear.

Jon Rottenberg from the University of South Florida, who conducted the research, tells Claudia whether having a good cry really is good for you.

Additional Information:

PubMed Central: Magnetic Seizure Therapy

Cardiff University

Magstim.com

Royal College of Psychiatrists: Debt and Mental Health

Royal College of Psychiatrists: Debt and Mental Health (Chris Fitch)

Money Advice Trust: Debt and Mental Health Resources

Mind: Money and Mental Health

Foresight: Mental Health (pdf)

University of South Florida: Dr Jonathan Rottenberg

University of South Florida: Mood and Emotion Lab 
    The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites
    Listen Live
    Audio Help

    All in the Mind

    Episodes
    Archived Episodes
    Science, Nature & Environment


    About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy