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science
ALL IN THE MIND
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All in the Mind
Wednesday 16:30-17:00
Exploring the limits and potential of the mind
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This week  
Wednesday 27 December 2006
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Claudia Hammond examines the everyday psychological challenges we face and delves deeper into how our brains work. 
Programme details
FALSE CONFESSIONS
Claudia Hammond speaks to Gisli Gudjonsson, Professor of Forensic Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings' College Hospital, London, about his research into false confessions. 
He has been involved with many high profile cases and has written: The Psychology of Interrogations and Confessions: a Handbook -  published by John Wiley.
His recent study looks at the relationship between people who make false confessions (to police, parents and teachers) and their perceptions of their parental rearing practices. His research was done in Iceland in conjunction with colleagues at the University Hospital, Reykjavik, and published in the Scandinavian Journal of Psychology in November 2006.

UNIVERSALITY OF COLOUR NAMING
So you thought you knew the colours of the rainbow? Well, depending on where you live in the world, new research shows that we not only SEE different colours - but we also divide the spectrum up differently too. Claudia discusses the differences with Dr. Delwin T Lindsey, Associate Professor of Psychology, Ohio State University.

MINDBALL
Claudia Hammond visits the Science Museum in London where she speaks to Jennie Pollard, Exhibition Developer. They play the Mindball Game - on display as part of the NEURObotics Exhibition until April.
Our brains give off electrical signals – Alpha and Theta waves are increased when we are calm. Players wear a headband which has three metal sensors. These pick up the brainwaves – the stronger the waves the more the sensors pick them up. The brainwaves move the ball across the table and the calmest person wins the game.
The Science Museum are holding a competition to find the calmest visitor. Tomorrow and the next day (28 and 29 December) they’ll be playing winner-stays-on Mindball on a first-come, first-served basis. The most chilled-out brain wins a Grand Prize.

EEG NEUROFEEDBACK
Claudia Hammond speaks to Professor John Gruzelier, Psychology Department, Goldsmiths College, University of London. His work also appears as part of the NEURObotics Exhibition at the Science Museum. His research at Goldsmiths focuses primarily on enhancing function, with application to peak performance, notably in the performing and originating arts, and the cognitive enhancement of processes including attention, memory, reasoning, creativity, artistry, and motor skills, including microsurgical skills.
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